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The Least and Most Wheelchair-Friendly Cities for Public Transportation

Cheapism Logo By Jason Notte of Cheapism | Slide 3 of 31: Only a quarter of New York City subway stops are wheelchair accessible. Even when those subway stations are improved, elevators are rarely among the added perks. Buses are more accessible, but have more limited hours, and the paratransit service wont schedule late-night stops. More than 500,000 people in the city require wheelchair access, but public transit's indifference to it isn't surprising: Roughly 36 percent of people in wheelchairs live in homes that aren't wheelchair-accessible, which includes more than 47 percent of all public housing.

WORST: NEW YORK

Only a quarter of New York City subway stops are wheelchair accessible. Even when those subway stations are improved, elevators are rarely among the added perks. Buses are more accessible, but have more limited hours, and the paratransit service wont schedule late-night stops. More than 500,000 people in the city require wheelchair access, but public transit's indifference to it isn't surprising: Roughly 36 percent of people in wheelchairs live in homes that aren't wheelchair-accessible, which includes more than 47 percent of all public housing.

© Orbon Alija/istockphoto

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