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10 of the World's Scariest Airports to Fly Into

Architectural Digest Logo By Nick Mafi of Architectural Digest | Slide 1 of 11: <p>Of all modes of transportation, airplanes are statistically the safest way to travel. According to a study conducted from 2000 to 2009 by Ian Savage, economics professor at Northwestern University, airplanes caused the least number of passenger deaths per one billion miles traveled (0.07), while motorcycles caused the most (213). Still, we don't blame you if you are afraid to fly. While turbulence and claustrophobia are two main reasons travelers feel uneasy on airplanes, it's the landing that often keeps people on the edge of their seats. Of course, landings can be anxiety-inducing for a number of reasons, from limited visibility and small airstrips to navigating through the world's tallest mountain range. Here, AD rounds up ten of the most terrifying airports to fly into, from a runway that is literally a sandy beach in the United Kingdom to another that sits within the foothills of Mt. Everest in the Himalayas.</p>

Of all modes of transportation, airplanes are statistically the safest way to travel. According to a study conducted from 2000 to 2009 by Ian Savage, economics professor at Northwestern University, airplanes caused the least number of passenger deaths per one billion miles traveled (0.07), while motorcycles caused the most (213). Still, we don't blame you if you are afraid to fly. While turbulence and claustrophobia are two main reasons travelers feel uneasy on airplanes, it's the landing that often keeps people on the edge of their seats. Of course, landings can be anxiety-inducing for a number of reasons, from limited visibility and small airstrips to navigating through the world's tallest mountain range. Here, AD rounds up ten of the most terrifying airports to fly into, from a runway that is literally a sandy beach in the United Kingdom to another that sits within the foothills of Mt. Everest in the Himalayas.

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