You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

The Strangest Things Airline Workers Have Experienced on a Flight

Reader's Digest Logo By Lauren Cahn of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 10: Just before takeoff, while one of her colleagues was finishing the safety briefing, Farida Boland, a flight attendant and senior purser for over a decade and co-founder of HolidayPromoCode.com, heard a baby crying, but she couldn't figure out where the sound was coming from. The cries were kind of muffled, and the sound seemed to be coming from nowhere in particular. And then she realized: It was coming from one of the overhead luggage bins. Turned out that one of the passengers had managed to stow her baby, snug in its bassinet, into the overhead bin without anyone seeing. Believe it or not, Farida explains, this wasn't a sign that the woman was a bad mother. Rather, in some cultures, it isn't uncommon for first-time fliers to be under the misapprehension that the overhead bin isn't just a place to stow carry-on luggage, but also a perfectly cozy sleeping cove for a newborn or infant baby. Farida located where the cries were coming from, reached up, took the baby (leaving the bassinet, which is where it belongs on a plane) and handed to its mother, who was confused until Farida managed to explain that babies without their own seats must be held during takeoff. Learn some more funny and surprising things your flight attendant won't tell you.

Rock-a-bye baby... in the overhead bin?

Just before takeoff, while one of her colleagues was finishing the safety briefing, Farida Boland, a flight attendant and senior purser for over a decade and co-founder of HolidayPromoCode.com, heard a baby crying, but she couldn't figure out where the sound was coming from. The cries were kind of muffled, and the sound seemed to be coming from nowhere in particular. And then she realized: It was coming from one of the overhead luggage bins. Turned out that one of the passengers had managed to stow her baby, snug in its bassinet, into the overhead bin without anyone seeing. Believe it or not, Farida explains, this wasn't a sign that the woman was a bad mother. Rather, in some cultures, it isn't uncommon for first-time fliers to be under the misapprehension that the overhead bin isn't just a place to stow carry-on luggage, but also a perfectly cozy sleeping cove for a newborn or infant baby. Farida located where the cries were coming from, reached up, took the baby (leaving the bassinet, which is where it belongs on a plane) and handed to its mother, who was confused until Farida managed to explain that babies without their own seats must be held during takeoff. 
© Yaoinlove/Shutterstock

More from Reader's Digest

Reader's Digest
Reader's Digest
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon