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The Dramatic History of London’s Underground

Architectural Digest Logo By Elizabeth Stamp of Architectural Digest | Slide 1 of 10: “The Underground has been part of my life for as long as I can remember,” says Green. “I was brought up in north London and went to school every day on the Northern Line. I always felt sorry for people in south London who weren’t on the Tube map. If you lived in Bromley or Croydon you weren’t really part of London.” The original glass-and-iron roof constructed in 1876 still shelters Earl’s Court, the District Line’s hub.

“The Underground has been part of my life for as long as I can remember,” says Green. “I was brought up in north London and went to school every day on the Northern Line. I always felt sorry for people in south London who weren’t on the Tube map. If you lived in Bromley or Croydon you weren’t really part of London.” The original glass-and-iron roof constructed in 1876 still shelters Earl’s Court, the District Line’s hub.
© Photo: Benjamin Graham

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