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TSA Just Let Another Loaded Handgun Board a Flight

TravelPulse logo TravelPulse 4/20/2017 Donald Wood

A Transportation Security Administration (TSA) sign stands at Ronald Reagan National Airport (DCA) in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. Financing for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is set to lapse after Friday and the agency would face a partial shutdown unless Congress provides new money. More than 200,000 government employees deemed essential at DHS, including TSA officers, would still have to report to their posts, even though their pay would stop unless Congress finds a solution. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg © Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg A Transportation Security Administration (TSA) sign stands at Ronald Reagan National Airport (DCA) in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. Financing for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is set to lapse after Friday and the agency would face a partial shutdown unless Congress provides new money. More than 200,000 government employees deemed essential at DHS, including TSA officers, would still have to report to their posts, even though their pay would stop unless Congress finds a solution. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg The Transportation Security Administration revealed Wednesday that officers at a security checkpoint were to blame for a female police officer who accidentally brought a handgun on a flight to Taiwan last week.

According to NBCNews.com, the unidentified 43-year-old officer flew to Taipei on a flight from Los Angeles with her handgun in a carry-on bag. When she landed, the officer reported the gun to officials at Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport and was questioned by aviation police before being detained.

TSA officials released a statement about how someone could have accidentally brought a gun through international security.

“TSA has determined standard procedures were not followed and a police officer did in fact pass through the checkpoint with a firearm,” the statement read. “TSA expects every employee to follow procedures and holds its workforce appropriately accountable.”

The current rules in place prohibit firearms from being transported in carry-on luggage, but travelers are permitted to store guns in checked luggage as long as the weapons are unloaded and the airline has been properly notified.

Unfortunately, this is not the only incident TSA has dealt with over the last few months. In March, the agency was forced to fire an employee who allegedly missed a loaded handgun in the carry-on bag of a passenger at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

The news isn’t all bad, though, as TSA officials announced that its officers had seized 3,391 firearms at nearly 240 different airports in 2016, a 28 percent jump from 2015.

While that many guns being confiscated is alarming, it means agents at security checkpoints are doing their jobs, for the most part.

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(Provided by USA Today)

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