You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Five amazing natural phenomena that are harder to see than a total eclipse

Popular Science Logo By Rachel Feltman of Popular Science | Slide 1 of 6: Sailing stones.

Five amazing natural phenomena that are harder to see than a total eclipse

That's a wrap on another total solar eclipse. And while the coincidental geometry and views of the phenomenon are certainly awe-inspiring, it's worth noting it's not that hard to see a total eclipse. Yes, it's a rare scenario—the last time the path of totality swept across the entire nation was in 1918—but a smaller swath of the country will be hit with totality in 2024, and 2045 will usher in a path almost as nation-wide as the one we were treated to this year. If you're willing and able to travel a smidgen further, South America is set to see total eclipses in 2019 and 2020. In other words, given the average U.S. life expectancy of around 79 years, most folks will have the chance to drive or fly to a total eclipse at least once, if not more. Not to mention the fact that partial eclipses—which are also pretty dang cool—are even more common. That's why, even though we were super excited for the total eclipse, you shouldn't sweat it if you couldn't swing a trip to the path of totality. This sort of all-American eclipse event might be a once-in-a-lifetime event, but the viewing of a total eclipse is a little less singular. And more importantly, eclipses are predictable. You always know when the next one is going to be, and where. So if your absolute greatest heart's desire is to get to see one in person, you can almost certainly make it happen. If you save 10 bucks a month starting now, you'll have a cool $800 in the bank to finance your whirlwind eclipse trip to Texas, Maine, or somewhere in between. If the eclipse frenzy has you hungry to go experience other awe-inspiring phenomena (or desperate to read about anything but the solar eclipse), here are a few rare sights you might consider trying to track down.

© DepositPhotos

More From Popular Science

Popular Science
Popular Science
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon