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See the National Wildlife Federation photo contest winners

USA TODAY Logo By USA TODAY of USA TODAY | Slide 1 of 17: The National Wildlife Federation and its National Wildlife magazine have announced winners of their National Wildlife Photo Contest, starting with the grand prize, which went to Alex Rose of  Woodridge, Illinois.    According to NWF: As its eye catches the gleam of a setting sun, an American crocodile gulps a breath of air before retreating to pass the night in the safety of mangroves within Cuba’s Jardines de la Reina, an archipelago off the southern coast. Covering some 840 square miles, this network of islands, lagoons and mangrove swamps is one of Cuba’s largest protected areas, where fish, corals and crocs thrive. Alex Rose was there with a team documenting sharks to promote their conservation. At day’s end, they went to photograph crocs, a task Rose approached with caution and help from a local guide who had observed the reptiles for years. “These wild animals are so powerful and impressive,” says Rose, who urges people to feel respect rather than fear. Just inches apart, she and the croc drifted in silent harmony until it vanished.

The National Wildlife Federation and its National Wildlife magazine have announced winners of their National Wildlife Photo Contest, starting with the grand prize, which went to Alex Rose of  Woodridge, Illinois.  

According to NWF: As its eye catches the gleam of a setting sun, an American crocodile gulps a breath of air before retreating to pass the night in the safety of mangroves within Cuba’s Jardines de la Reina, an archipelago off the southern coast. Covering some 840 square miles, this network of islands, lagoons and mangrove swamps is one of Cuba’s largest protected areas, where fish, corals and crocs thrive. Alex Rose was there with a team documenting sharks to promote their conservation. At day’s end, they went to photograph crocs, a task Rose approached with caution and help from a local guide who had observed the reptiles for years. “These wild animals are so powerful and impressive,” says Rose, who urges people to feel respect rather than fear. Just inches apart, she and the croc drifted in silent harmony until it vanished.
© Alex Rose, 2020 National Wildlife® Photo Contest

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