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These Are the 15 Best Places to See the Solar Eclipse — For Free

GOBankingRates Logo By Lauren Monitz of GOBankingRates | Slide 1 of 16: <p>The conditions for a total solar eclipse to occur are rare — the orbits of the sun, moon and earth need to line up perfectly. Time Magazine called it “cosmic serendipity,” truly a rare gift to be able to experience once in your lifetime. The last time any part of the continental U.S. saw a total solar eclipse was 38 years ago in 1979, and this year the eclipse is passing across the entire country. On August 21, 2017, North America will see the shrew of darkness from Lincoln Beach, Oregon all the way to Charleston, South Carolina as the eclipse travels across the continent. We’ve partnered with <a href="https://www.homeaway.com/">HomeAway</a> to highlight the best U.S. locations for viewing the highly anticipated celestial event in every state the eclipse passes through.</p><p>To get scientific for a second, a solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the sun and the earth, blocking all or part of the sun. Partial solar eclipses happen more regularly, but people who witness a total eclipse say it can be a life-changing experience. The 2017 total solar eclipse will cross over 14 states blessed with the darkest, most dramatic skies. The "path of totality" is where the sun is completely obscured by the moon’s effervescent glow. The eclipse will touch portions of Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana (only a very small section of the state without any roads), Nebraska, Iowa (only the very southwest corner of the state), Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and the Carolinas.</p><p>If you want to see the eclipse and learn something, too, here are <a href="https://www.gobankingrates.com/personal-finance/free-things-do-state/">the best free places to check out</a>. </p>

The conditions for a total solar eclipse to occur are rare — the orbits of the sun, moon and earth need to line up perfectly. Time Magazine called it “cosmic serendipity,” truly a rare gift to be able to experience once in your lifetime. The last time any part of the continental U.S. saw a total solar eclipse was 38 years ago in 1979, and this year the eclipse is passing across the entire country. On August 21, 2017, North America will see the shrew of darkness from Lincoln Beach, Oregon all the way to Charleston, South Carolina as the eclipse travels across the continent. We’ve partnered with HomeAway to highlight the best U.S. locations for viewing the highly anticipated celestial event in every state the eclipse passes through.

To get scientific for a second, a solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the sun and the earth, blocking all or part of the sun. Partial solar eclipses happen more regularly, but people who witness a total eclipse say it can be a life-changing experience. The 2017 total solar eclipse will cross over 14 states blessed with the darkest, most dramatic skies. The "path of totality" is where the sun is completely obscured by the moon’s effervescent glow. The eclipse will touch portions of Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana (only a very small section of the state without any roads), Nebraska, Iowa (only the very southwest corner of the state), Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and the Carolinas.

If you want to see the eclipse and learn something, too, here are the best free places to check out.

© Rob Stothard / Getty Images

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