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A film claims to solve the mystery of Amelia Earhart's fate

Associated Press logo Associated Press 7/5/2017 By FRAZIER MOORE, AP Television Writer
FILE - In this June 6, 1937, file photo, Amelia Earhart, the American airwoman who is flying round the world for fun, arrived at Port Natal, Brazil, and took off on her 2,240-mile flight across the South Atlantic to Dakar, Africa. A new documentary "Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence," which airs Sunday, July 9, 2017, on the History channel, proposes Earhart didn't die without a trace 80 years ago. Instead, the film argues that she and her navigator Fred Noonan crash-landed in the Japanese-held Marshall Islands, were picked up by Japanese military and that Earhart was taken prisoner. (AP Photo, File) © The Associated Press FILE - In this June 6, 1937, file photo, Amelia Earhart, the American airwoman who is flying round the world for fun, arrived at Port Natal, Brazil, and took off on her 2,240-mile flight across the South Atlantic to Dakar, Africa. A new documentary "Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence," which airs Sunday, July 9, 2017, on the History channel, proposes Earhart didn't die without a trace 80 years ago. Instead, the film argues that she and her navigator Fred Noonan crash-landed in the Japanese-held Marshall Islands, were picked up by Japanese military and that Earhart was taken prisoner. (AP Photo, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — A new documentary proposes that pioneering aviator Amelia Earhart didn't die without a trace 80 years ago this month.

Instead, the film argues that she and her navigator Fred Noonan crash-landed in the Japanese-held Marshall Islands, were picked up by Japanese military and that Earhart was taken prisoner.

The film also proposes that the United States government knew of her whereabouts and did nothing to rescue her.

The disappearance of Earhart and Noonan in July 1937 has gained legendary status among the age's unsolved mysteries. By then she had already logged numerous aviation feats, including that of being the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.

"Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence" airs Sunday on the History channel.

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