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Affidavit: Doctor prescribed meds for Prince in another name

Associated Press logo Associated Press 4/17/2017 By AMY FORLITI, Associated Press
FILE - In this Feb. 18, 1985 file photo, Prince performs at the Forum in Inglewood, Calif. A year after Prince died of an accidental drug overdose, his Paisley Park studio complex and home is now a museum and concert venue. Fans can now stream most of his classic albums, and a remastered "Purple Rain" album is due out in June 2017 along with two albums of unreleased music and two concert films from his vault. (AP Photo/Liu Heung Shing, File) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Feb. 18, 1985 file photo, Prince performs at the Forum in Inglewood, Calif. A year after Prince died of an accidental drug overdose, his Paisley Park studio complex and home is now a museum and concert venue. Fans can now stream most of his classic albums, and a remastered "Purple Rain" album is due out in June 2017 along with two albums of unreleased music and two concert films from his vault. (AP Photo/Liu Heung Shing, File)

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A doctor who saw Prince in the days before he died had prescribed oxycodone under the name of Prince's friend to protect the musician's privacy, according to an affidavit unsealed Monday.

FILE - In this June 1, 2006, file photo, drummer Kirk Johnson speaks at a news conference during the first rehearsal by members of the new band The Truth in Minneapolis. Johnson, a longtime drummer for Prince and estate manager at Paisley Park who was among those who discovered the musician's body April 21, 2016, is one of the key figures investigators want to interview in relation to his death. (Jeff Wheeler/Star Tribune via AP, File)/Star Tribune via AP) © The Associated Press FILE - In this June 1, 2006, file photo, drummer Kirk Johnson speaks at a news conference during the first rehearsal by members of the new band The Truth in Minneapolis. Johnson, a longtime drummer for Prince and estate manager at Paisley Park who was among those who discovered the musician's body April 21, 2016, is one of the key figures investigators want to interview in relation to his death. (Jeff Wheeler/Star Tribune via AP, File)/Star Tribune via AP)

The document is one of several affidavits and search warrants unsealed in Carver County District Court as the yearlong investigation into Prince's death continues.

FILE - In this Feb. 4, 2007, file photo, Prince performs during the halftime show at the Super Bowl XLI football game in Miami. Nearly a year after Prince died from an accidental drug overdose in his suburban Minneapolis studio and estate, investigators still haven't interviewed a key associate nor asked a grand jury to investigate potential criminal charges, according to an official with knowledge of the investigation. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Feb. 4, 2007, file photo, Prince performs during the halftime show at the Super Bowl XLI football game in Miami. Nearly a year after Prince died from an accidental drug overdose in his suburban Minneapolis studio and estate, investigators still haven't interviewed a key associate nor asked a grand jury to investigate potential criminal charges, according to an official with knowledge of the investigation. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)

The documents don't say where Prince got the fentanyl that killed him, which was obtained illegally and not by prescription. But they do shed some light on Prince's struggle in the days before he died. Oxycodone was not listed as a cause of Prince's death.

FILE - In this April 21, 2016, file photo, a rainbow appears over Prince's Paisley Park estate near a memorial for the rock superstar in Chanhassen, Minn. Nearly a year after Prince died from an accidental drug overdose in his suburban Minneapolis studio and estate, investigators still haven't interviewed a key associate nor asked a grand jury to investigate potential criminal charges, according to an official with knowledge of the investigation. (Carlos Gonzalez/Star Tribune via AP, File) © The Associated Press FILE - In this April 21, 2016, file photo, a rainbow appears over Prince's Paisley Park estate near a memorial for the rock superstar in Chanhassen, Minn. Nearly a year after Prince died from an accidental drug overdose in his suburban Minneapolis studio and estate, investigators still haven't interviewed a key associate nor asked a grand jury to investigate potential criminal charges, according to an official with knowledge of the investigation. (Carlos Gonzalez/Star Tribune via AP, File)

Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park home on April 21. Autopsy results showed he died from an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic drug 50 times more powerful than heroin.

According to the search warrants, authorities searched Paisley Park, cellphone records of Prince's associates, and Prince's email accounts to try to determine where he got the fentanyl.

A search of Prince's home yielded numerous pills in various containers. Some were in prescription bottles that were under the name Kirk Johnson, Prince's longtime friend and associate. Some were counterfeit. At least one counterfeit pill tested positive for fentanyl.

The documents suggest Prince was struggling with an addiction to prescription opioids. Just six days before he died, Prince fell ill on a plane and made an emergency stop in Illinois as he was returning home from a concert in Atlanta. First responders revived him with two doses of a drug that reverses the effects of an opioid overdose.

One affidavit says Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg, who saw Prince last April 7 and again on April 20, admitted to authorities that he prescribed oxycodone for Prince the same day as the emergency plane landing "but put the prescription in Kirk Johnson's name for Prince's privacy."

Authorities also searched Johnson's cellphone records, to see who he was communicating with in the month before Prince died.

Messages left with attorneys for Schulenberg and Johnson weren't immediately returned Monday.

Investigators haven't interviewed either Johnson or Schulenberg since the hours after Prince died, an official with knowledge of the investigation told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing.

While authorities have the power to ask a grand jury to investigate and issue subpoenas for testimony, that step hasn't been taken, the official said.

Prince did not have a cellphone, and authorities searched multiple email accounts that belonged to him, as they tried to determine who he was communicating with and where he got the drugs that killed him, according to the search warrants. The search warrants don't reveal the outcome of the email searches.

Investigators have said little about the case over the last year, other than it is active. The official who spoke to the AP said the case has taken investigators to Illinois and California, as authorities have interviewed friends, family and any potential witnesses, including the flight crew and hospital staff that were present when Prince overdosed on the plane.

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Follow Amy Forliti on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/amyforliti . More of her work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/amy-forliti

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