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AP's legendary 'Napalm Girl' photographer Nick Ut to retire

Associated Press logo Associated Press 3/13/2017 By JOHN ROGERS, Associated Press
FILE - In this June 8, 1972 file photo taken by Huynh Cong "Nick' Ut, South Vietnamese forces follow terrified children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, as they run down Route 1 near Trang Bang after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places. After making the photo, he set aside his camera, gave the badly burned girl water, poured more on her wounds, then loaded her and others into his AP van to take them to a hospital. When doctors refused to admit her, saying she was too badly burned to be saved, he angrily flashed his press pass. The next day, he told them, pictures of her would be displayed all over the world, along with an explanation of how the hospital refused to help. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File) © The Associated Press FILE - In this June 8, 1972 file photo taken by Huynh Cong "Nick' Ut, South Vietnamese forces follow terrified children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, as they run down Route 1 near Trang Bang after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places. After making the photo, he set aside his camera, gave the badly burned girl water, poured more on her wounds, then loaded her and others into his AP van to take them to a hospital. When doctors refused to admit her, saying she was too badly burned to be saved, he angrily flashed his press pass. The next day, he told them, pictures of her would be displayed all over the world, along with an explanation of how the hospital refused to help. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — It would seem all but impossible to sum up one of the most distinguished careers in photojournalism in only four words, but that's just what Nick Ut does when he says, "From hell to Hollywood."

FILE - In this Tuesday, April 19, 2011 photo, Associated Press Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Nick Ut poses for a photo in Los Angeles. Ut will be retiring from the AP in March 2017 after 51 years of taking photographs from the front lines of the Vietnam War to the red carpets of Hollywood. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Tuesday, April 19, 2011 photo, Associated Press Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Nick Ut poses for a photo in Los Angeles. Ut will be retiring from the AP in March 2017 after 51 years of taking photographs from the front lines of the Vietnam War to the red carpets of Hollywood. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

And the Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer, who is retiring this month after 51 years with The Associated Press, has the pictures to prove it, the most famous being a stunning black-and-white image from the Vietnam War that's come to be known simply as "Napalm Girl."

FILE - In this 1973 file photo, Phan Thi Kim Phuc, left, is visited by Associated Press photographer Nick Ut at her home in Trang Bang, Vietnam. As a 9-year-old, Kim Phuc was the subject of a Pulitzer Prize-winning photo by Ut as she fled in pain from a misdirected napalm attack against her village by South Vietnamese planes in 1972. After taking the photograph, Ut came to the girl's aid and transported her to a hospital. (AP Photo) © The Associated Press FILE - In this 1973 file photo, Phan Thi Kim Phuc, left, is visited by Associated Press photographer Nick Ut at her home in Trang Bang, Vietnam. As a 9-year-old, Kim Phuc was the subject of a Pulitzer Prize-winning photo by Ut as she fled in pain from a misdirected napalm attack against her village by South Vietnamese planes in 1972. After taking the photograph, Ut came to the girl's aid and transported her to a hospital. (AP Photo)

It's the photo of a terrified child running naked down a country road, her body literally burning from the napalm bombs dropped on her village just moments before Ut captured the iconic image.

FILE - In this Sunday, June 3, 2012 file photo, Associated Press staff photographer Nick Ut, left, meets Phan Thi Kim Phuc during a presentation at the Liberty Baptist Church in Newport Beach, Calif. "That picture changed my life. It changed Kim's life," he says of the pair's chance meeting in a dusty Vietnamese village called Trang Bang. He'd just finished photographing four planes flying low to drop the napalm that would set Phuc’s village ablaze when he saw a terrified group of men, women and children running for their lives from a pagoda. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Sunday, June 3, 2012 file photo, Associated Press staff photographer Nick Ut, left, meets Phan Thi Kim Phuc during a presentation at the Liberty Baptist Church in Newport Beach, Calif. "That picture changed my life. It changed Kim's life," he says of the pair's chance meeting in a dusty Vietnamese village called Trang Bang. He'd just finished photographing four planes flying low to drop the napalm that would set Phuc’s village ablaze when he saw a terrified group of men, women and children running for their lives from a pagoda. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

"That photograph illustrated dramatically what had become a regular occurrence in Vietnam over the years — napalm on distant villages, civilians killed and scared by the war, pictures we'd rarely had in the past," said Peter Arnett, a distinguished network news war correspondent and Pulitzer Prize winner himself. "This picture revealed the kind of details that were an integral part of what the war had been about, which made it so significant and important to be published."

FILE - In this June 8, 1972 file photo taken by Associated Press photographer Huynh Cong "Nick" Ut, a Skyraider, a propeller driven plane of the Vietnamese Airforce (VNAF) 518th Squadron, drops a bomb with incendiary napalm and white phosphorus jelly over Trang Bang village. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File) © The Associated Press FILE - In this June 8, 1972 file photo taken by Associated Press photographer Huynh Cong "Nick" Ut, a Skyraider, a propeller driven plane of the Vietnamese Airforce (VNAF) 518th Squadron, drops a bomb with incendiary napalm and white phosphorus jelly over Trang Bang village. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)

Ut was only 21 when he took that photo on June 8, 1972, then set his camera aside to rush 9-year-old Kim Phuc to a hospital, where doctors saved her life. He would go on to take literally tens of thousands more over the next 44 years, including images of practically every A-list celebrity who walked a Hollywood red carpet or entered a courtroom on the wrong side of the law.

FILE - In this June 8, 1972 file photo, vombs with a mixture of napalm and white phosphorus jelly dropped by Vietnamese AF Skyraider bombers explode across Route-1, amidst homes and in front of the Cao Dai temple in the outskirts of Trang Bang, Vietnam. In the foreground are Vietnamese soldiers and journalists from various international news organizations. The towers of the Trang Bang Cao Dai temple are visible in the centre of the explosions. (AP Photo/Nick Ut) © The Associated Press FILE - In this June 8, 1972 file photo, vombs with a mixture of napalm and white phosphorus jelly dropped by Vietnamese AF Skyraider bombers explode across Route-1, amidst homes and in front of the Cao Dai temple in the outskirts of Trang Bang, Vietnam. In the foreground are Vietnamese soldiers and journalists from various international news organizations. The towers of the Trang Bang Cao Dai temple are visible in the centre of the explosions. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

"Every star who has trouble, they will see me," jokes the friendly 65-year-old photographer who, although his thick, dark hair has grayed over the years, retains both a boyish charm and irrepressible enthusiasm for his work.

FILE - This undated file photo shows Associated Press photographer Nick Ut in Vietnam. Ut will be retiring from the AP in March 2017 after 51 years of taking photographs from the front lines of the Vietnam War to the red carpets of Hollywood. (AP Photo) © The Associated Press FILE - This undated file photo shows Associated Press photographer Nick Ut in Vietnam. Ut will be retiring from the AP in March 2017 after 51 years of taking photographs from the front lines of the Vietnam War to the red carpets of Hollywood. (AP Photo)

On a recent morning in a conference room of the AP's Los Angeles bureau, Ut clicks through a portfolio showing a few of his most famous images.

FILE - In this Wednesday, June 23, 1976 file photo, Muhammad Ali throws a left punch at a sandbag during workout at a gym in Tokyo. Later in the week, the world heavyweight boxing champion met Japanese pro wrestler Antonio Inoki in the world's Martial Arts Championship. (AP Photo/Nick Ut) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Wednesday, June 23, 1976 file photo, Muhammad Ali throws a left punch at a sandbag during workout at a gym in Tokyo. Later in the week, the world heavyweight boxing champion met Japanese pro wrestler Antonio Inoki in the world's Martial Arts Championship. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

There's one of a sobbing Robert Blake, the actor's head on a courtroom table moments after he was acquitted of killing his wife. In another, Michael Jackson is dancing on an SUV outside a courtroom where he would be acquitted of child molestation. Perhaps the most ironic of all, of a tearful Paris Hilton headed to jail for driving violations, was taken on June 8, 2007, the 35th anniversary of the day he took the "Napalm Girl" picture.

FILE - In this March 11, 1972 file photo, a South Vietnamese soldier holds his personal belongings in a plastic bag between his teeth as his unit crosses a muddy Mekong Delta stream in Vietnam near the Cambodian border. His unit was charged with stemming Communist infiltration from Cambodia into South Vietnam in the heavily populated Mekong Delta area. (AP Photo/Nick Ut) © The Associated Press FILE - In this March 11, 1972 file photo, a South Vietnamese soldier holds his personal belongings in a plastic bag between his teeth as his unit crosses a muddy Mekong Delta stream in Vietnam near the Cambodian border. His unit was charged with stemming Communist infiltration from Cambodia into South Vietnam in the heavily populated Mekong Delta area. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

Warren Beatty once called Ut aside at a Hollywood Walk of Fame ceremony to spend 30 minutes talking about the "Napalm Girl" photo. After learning he was the one who took it, actress Joan Collins opened a bottle of champagne for Ut during a shoot at her home. It was a much friendlier reaction, he says, than the one he got when he previously photographed her heading into a courtroom to settle an acrimonious divorce.

FILE - In this Saturday, May 29, 2004 file photo, people gather on a pier in Huntington Beach, Calif., as the sun sets. AP Photographer Nick Ut will be retiring from the AP in March 2017 after 51 years of taking photographs from the front lines of the Vietnam War to the red carpets of Hollywood. (AP Photo/Nick Ut) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Saturday, May 29, 2004 file photo, people gather on a pier in Huntington Beach, Calif., as the sun sets. AP Photographer Nick Ut will be retiring from the AP in March 2017 after 51 years of taking photographs from the front lines of the Vietnam War to the red carpets of Hollywood. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

"That picture changed my life. It changed Kim's life," he says of the pair's chance meeting in a dusty Vietnamese village called Trang Bang. He'd just finished photographing four planes flying low to drop the napalm that would set Phuc's village ablaze when he saw a terrified group of men, women and children running for their lives from a pagoda.

FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 26, 1994 file photo, O.J. Simpson and defense attorney Robert Shapiro sit in a Los Angeles Superior courtroom as Judge Lance Ito refused a request to open an afternoon session to the media. AP Photographer Nick Ut will be retiring from the AP in March 2017 after 51 years of taking photographs from the front lines of the Vietnam War to the red carpets of Hollywood. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, Pool) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 26, 1994 file photo, O.J. Simpson and defense attorney Robert Shapiro sit in a Los Angeles Superior courtroom as Judge Lance Ito refused a request to open an afternoon session to the media. AP Photographer Nick Ut will be retiring from the AP in March 2017 after 51 years of taking photographs from the front lines of the Vietnam War to the red carpets of Hollywood. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, Pool)

After getting that perfectly framed photo, he set aside his camera, gave the badly burned girl water, poured more on her wounds, then loaded her and others into his AP van to take them to a hospital. When doctors refused to admit her, saying she was too badly burned to be saved, he angrily flashed his press pass. The next day, he told them, pictures of her would be displayed all over the world, along with an explanation of how the hospital refused to help.

FILE - In this Friday, June 8, 2007 file photo, Paris Hilton is transported in a police car from her home to court by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department in Los Angeles. As she was taken to jail for driving violations, this photo was made on the 35th anniversary of the day Ut made the "Napalm Girl" picture in Vietnam. (AP Photo/Nick Ut) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Friday, June 8, 2007 file photo, Paris Hilton is transported in a police car from her home to court by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department in Los Angeles. As she was taken to jail for driving violations, this photo was made on the 35th anniversary of the day Ut made the "Napalm Girl" picture in Vietnam. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

"I cried when I saw her running," Ut once told an AP reporter. "If I don't help her — if something happened and she died — I think I'd kill myself after that."

FILE - In this April 6, 1982 file photo, screen legend Bette Davis smokes a cigarette at an awards presentation in her honor in Beverly Hills, Calif. Davis was feted by the Film Advisory Board for her "outstanding contribution to the film and entertainment industry." (AP Photo/Nick Ut) © The Associated Press FILE - In this April 6, 1982 file photo, screen legend Bette Davis smokes a cigarette at an awards presentation in her honor in Beverly Hills, Calif. Davis was feted by the Film Advisory Board for her "outstanding contribution to the film and entertainment industry." (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

Now a 53-year-old wife and mother of two who lives in Canada, Kim Phuc remains Ut's close friend.

FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 16, 2004 file photo, Michael Jackson waves to his fans from atop his limousine after his arraignment on child molestation charges at the courthouse in Santa Maria, Calif. AP Photographer Nick Ut will be retiring from the AP in March 2017 after 51 years of taking photographs from the front lines of the Vietnam War to the red carpets of Hollywood. (AP Photo/Nick Ut) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 16, 2004 file photo, Michael Jackson waves to his fans from atop his limousine after his arraignment on child molestation charges at the courthouse in Santa Maria, Calif. AP Photographer Nick Ut will be retiring from the AP in March 2017 after 51 years of taking photographs from the front lines of the Vietnam War to the red carpets of Hollywood. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

But her photo, dramatic as it was, represented only a small slice of the horror Ut saw during those war years.

FILE - In this Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2009 file photo, a Los Angeles firefighter looks under a fire truck stuck in a sinkhole in the Valley Village neighborhood of Los Angeles. Four firefighters escaped injury early Tuesday after their vehicle sunk into the hole caused by a burst water main in the San Fernando Valley, authorities said. (AP Photo/Nick Ut) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2009 file photo, a Los Angeles firefighter looks under a fire truck stuck in a sinkhole in the Valley Village neighborhood of Los Angeles. Four firefighters escaped injury early Tuesday after their vehicle sunk into the hole caused by a burst water main in the San Fernando Valley, authorities said. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

As he flips through photos of villages destroyed, dead bodies piled everywhere and parents grieving over dead children, Ut tells how he came to be a combat photographer.

FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 5, 1984 file photo, President Ronald Reagan points toward the crowd as he speaks during a rally at Pierce College in the Woodland Hills area of Los Angeles. AP Photographer Nick Ut will be retiring from the AP in March 2017 after 51 years of taking photographs from the front lines of the Vietnam War to the red carpets of Hollywood. (AP Photo/Nick Ut) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 5, 1984 file photo, President Ronald Reagan points toward the crowd as he speaks during a rally at Pierce College in the Woodland Hills area of Los Angeles. AP Photographer Nick Ut will be retiring from the AP in March 2017 after 51 years of taking photographs from the front lines of the Vietnam War to the red carpets of Hollywood. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

The 11th of 12 children, he grew up idolizing one of his older brothers, Huynh Thanh My, an actor whose good looks seemed to have him destined for movie stardom until the Vietnam War got in the way. Huynh was hired by the AP and was on assignment in 1965 when he and a group of soldiers he was with were overrun by Viet Cong rebels who killed everyone.

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FILE - In this March 22, 1975 file photo, a refugee clutches a baby as a government helicopter gunship carries them away near Tuy Hoa, Vietnam, 235 miles northeast of Saigon. They were among thousands fleeing from Communist advances. (AP Photo/Nick Ut) © The Associated Press FILE - In this March 22, 1975 file photo, a refugee clutches a baby as a government helicopter gunship carries them away near Tuy Hoa, Vietnam, 235 miles northeast of Saigon. They were among thousands fleeing from Communist advances. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

At his brother's funeral, Ut approached the late Horst Faas, photo editor for AP's Saigon bureau, to ask for a job. But Faas, a two-time Pulitzer winner, turned him down cold. He didn't want the Huynh family losing another son.

After weeks of Ut's pestering, Faas finally relented, hiring him on Jan. 1, 1966, but giving the 15-year-old strict orders: Under no circumstances was he to carry his camera into a war zone.

So Ut spent the next couple of years working in the darkroom and shooting feature photos around Saigon until one January morning in 1968 when the war came to him.

"I remember Nick coming in later that morning very excited and saying, 'The Viet Cong are fighting near my house. I have pictures of Vietnamese troops attacking them, great pictures," Arnett, who worked for the AP then, recalled in a recent interview.

From that day forward, 17-year-old Huynh Cong Ut was a combat photographer.

Over the coming years he would be wounded four times and have a rocket come so close to his head that it literally parted his hair. His closest friend in the Saigon bureau, noted photographer Henri Huet, died in 1971 after volunteering to take the weary Ut's place on an assignment during which the helicopter he was in was shot down.

It was Huet, Ut says, who gave him his nickname, Nick, after others in the bureau had trouble getting his given name straight.

"That's why I keep the name Nick Ut. In Henri's honor," he says in a voice momentarily thick with emotion.

When Saigon fell to the rebels in 1975, two years after the U.S. military pulled out, Ut had to flee Vietnam like thousands of others. After a brief stay in a California refugee camp, the AP put him to work in its Tokyo bureau.

It was there he met his wife, Hong Huynh, another Vietnamese ex-pat. She even hailed from the same neighborhood as Ut, but the two had never met. They moved to Los Angeles in 1977 when Ut began the Hollywood chapter of his photo career. They have two grown children and two grandchildren, ages 8 and 10.

He plans to spend retirement helping take care of those grandchildren and, oh yes, taking more pictures.

"I'll take pictures until I die," laughs the diminutive photographer who is instantly recognizable around Los Angeles for his 5-foot-3-inch frame and his ear-to-ear grin. "My camera is like my doctor, my medicine."

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