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At Venice Biennale, American artist engages social issues

Associated Press logo Associated Press 5/12/2017 By COLLEEN BARRY, Associated Press
CORRECTS NAME OF ARTIST TO MARK BRADFORD -- US artist Mark Bradford poses next to his work at the Pavilion of the United States, during a preview of the 57th International Art Exhibition, in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 9, 2017. The Exhibition will be open to the public from Saturday May 13th to Sunday November 26th 2017, at the Giardini and the Arsenale venues. (Andrea Merola/ANSA via AP) © The Associated Press CORRECTS NAME OF ARTIST TO MARK BRADFORD -- US artist Mark Bradford poses next to his work at the Pavilion of the United States, during a preview of the 57th International Art Exhibition, in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 9, 2017. The Exhibition will be open to the public from Saturday May 13th to Sunday November 26th 2017, at the Giardini and the Arsenale venues. (Andrea Merola/ANSA via AP)

VENICE, Italy (AP) — A Los Angeles-based artist is representing the United States at the Venice Biennale with a show called "Tomorrow is Another Day."

A detail of the work of US artist Mark Bradford is seen at the Pavilion of the United States, during a preview of the 57th International Art Exhibition, in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 9, 2017. The Exhibition will be open to the public from Saturday May 13th to Sunday November 26th 2017, at the Giardini and the Arsenale venues. (Andrea Merola/ANSA via AP) © The Associated Press A detail of the work of US artist Mark Bradford is seen at the Pavilion of the United States, during a preview of the 57th International Art Exhibition, in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 9, 2017. The Exhibition will be open to the public from Saturday May 13th to Sunday November 26th 2017, at the Giardini and the Arsenale venues. (Andrea Merola/ANSA via AP)

The show examines what it is to be marginalized, part of a trend of Biennale artists engaging with communities on the fringe.

Bradford's show begins in a room with an imposing sculpture. Another room creates safe places for the artist as a young boy, evoking the hair salon where he once worked with his mother in South Central L.A. There are paintings and a sculpture representing Medusa's head as a hiding place.

In another area, the artist evokes slaves who built plantation buildings, leading to a gallery of paintings. A final room contains a video of a sauntering teenager as a sign of hope for the future.

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