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Court allows Polish government to take over WWII museum

Associated Press logo Associated Press 1/24/2017 By VANESSA GERA, Associated Press
A woman stands in front of an exhibit in the Museum of the Second World War, an ambitious new museum under creation for nine years has opened its doors for a day to historians, museums and reporters in Gdansk, Poland, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski) © The Associated Press A woman stands in front of an exhibit in the Museum of the Second World War, an ambitious new museum under creation for nine years has opened its doors for a day to historians, museums and reporters in Gdansk, Poland, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — A Polish court ruled Tuesday in favor of the government in its standoff with a major new World War II museum fighting for its survival.

A woman looks at an exhibit in the Museum of the Second World War, an ambitious new museum under creation for nine years has opened its doors for a day to historians, museums and reporters in Gdansk, Poland, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski) © The Associated Press A woman looks at an exhibit in the Museum of the Second World War, an ambitious new museum under creation for nine years has opened its doors for a day to historians, museums and reporters in Gdansk, Poland, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

The conflict revolves around the Museum of the Second World War in Gdansk, which has been under creation since 2008 and was scheduled to open within weeks.

Visitors look at an exhibit in the Museum of the Second World War, an ambitious new museum under creation for nine years has opened its doors for a day to historians, museums and reporters in Gdansk, Poland, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski) © The Associated Press Visitors look at an exhibit in the Museum of the Second World War, an ambitious new museum under creation for nine years has opened its doors for a day to historians, museums and reporters in Gdansk, Poland, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

The decision by the Supreme Administrative Court is a victory for the populist and nationalistic Law and Justice ruling party, allowing it to take control of one of the last public institutions that had remained independent following the party's rise to power in 2015.

A woman looks at an exhibit in the Museum of the Second World War, an ambitious new museum under creation for nine years has opened its doors for a day to historians, museums and reporters in Gdansk, Poland, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski) © The Associated Press A woman looks at an exhibit in the Museum of the Second World War, an ambitious new museum under creation for nine years has opened its doors for a day to historians, museums and reporters in Gdansk, Poland, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

"This is very bad," the museum's director, Pawel Machcewicz, said. "This ruling means that the Museum of the Second World War will be liquidated on the last day of January. It means that I will be gone and that the new director can try to change the exhibition or delay the opening."

The ruling party opposed the museum because it takes an international approach to telling the story of the war, focusing on the civilian suffering of the many nations caught up in the global conflict. Party leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski had for years vowed that if he ever had power he would change the institution to focus it exclusively on Polish suffering and military heroism.

The move is in line with what the ruling party calls its "historical policy" of harnessing the state's power to create a stronger sense of national identity and pride.

After assuming power in late 2015 Culture Minister Piotr Glinski moved to try to take control of the museum by merging it with another museum that exists only on paper, the Museum of Westerplatte and the War of 1939 — a legal maneuver aimed at pushing Machcewicz out.

That sparked months of legal wrangling as Machcewicz resisted the merger.

After the court's decision Tuesday, the Culture Ministry issued a statement saying that it would move ahead with its merger and that on Feb. 1 "a new cultural institution will be created — the Museum of the Second World War in Gdansk. The combination of both Gdansk institutions with a similar business profile will optimize costs ... and strengthen their positions on the museum map of Poland and the world."

Machcewicz says that even though he is losing his job he still plans to keep fighting for the survival of the exhibition, one created with the help of some of the world's most renowned war historians.

"The culture minister can come with heavy equipment and destroy an exhibition that cost 50 million zlotys ($12 million). But he can't just change some elements, because the exhibition is like a book that is protected by copyright laws," Machcewicz said. "And I am ready to sue the minister if he tries to change the exhibition."

On Monday the museum was presented to a group of reporters, historians and others to let the world get a glimpse of the nearly finished museum before it is too late.

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