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Execs From Netflix, Google, Facebook Sign Open Letter Against Immigration Ban

Variety logo Variety 2/3/2017 Janko Roettgers
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Executives from Netflix, Google and Facebook have signed a tech industry open letter opposing President Trump’s immigration ban, according to a Mother Jones report. The letter is being signed by more than 30 CEOs from some of the largest tech companies, and is scheduled to be delivered to the Trump administration next week.

“We are a nation made stronger by immigrants,” a draft version of the letter reads. “As entrepreneurs and business leaders, our ability to grow our companies and create jobs depends on the contributions of immigrants from all backgrounds.”

The letter goes on to acknowledge security concerns around immigration, while opposing the recent executive order that bans travel and immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries: “We are concerned (..) that your recent Executive Order will affect many visa holders who work here in the United States and contribute to our country’s success.”

The letter also defends the Obama administration’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) order, which has granted temporarily legal status to undocumented immigrants that arrived in the U.S. as children — a group that’s also commonly known as Dreamers.

The tech industry’s concern about visa holders being impacted by the order isn’t theoretical. On Friday, a Justice Department attorney acknowledged that the order led to the revoking of more than 100,000 visas. And earlier this week, Apple CEO Tim Cook said that hundreds of his company’s employees had been affected by the ban.

The open letter is just the latest sign of companies coming out against the ban, which is often driven as much by engagement from employees and customers as by executive leadership. Earlier this week alone, employees of Google and Comcast walked out to protest the ban. And on Thursday, Uber CEO Travis Kalanick stepped down from Trump’s business advisory council after a customer boycott campaign that reportedly led to the deletion of 200,000 Uber accounts.

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