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Exhibit explores heyday of Atlantic Ocean luxury liners

Associated Press logo Associated Press 5/19/2017 By TRACEE M. HERBAUGH, Associated Press
In this May 18, 2017 photo, visitors view a model of the Queen Elizabeth at an exhibition entitled "Ocean Liners: Glamour, Speed, and Style" at the Peabody Essex Museum, in Salem, Mass. The new exhibition of more than 200 artworks from around the globe pays homage to the ocean liner era. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) © The Associated Press In this May 18, 2017 photo, visitors view a model of the Queen Elizabeth at an exhibition entitled "Ocean Liners: Glamour, Speed, and Style" at the Peabody Essex Museum, in Salem, Mass. The new exhibition of more than 200 artworks from around the globe pays homage to the ocean liner era. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

SALEM, Mass. (AP) — A museum exhibit in Salem, Massachusetts, is exploring the golden era for the luxury liners that once crossed the Atlantic Ocean.

In this May 18, 2017 photo, a visitor enters an exhibition entitled "Ocean Liners: Glamour, Speed, and Style" at the Peabody Essex Museum, in Salem, Mass. The new exhibition of more than 200 artworks from around the globe pays homage to the ocean liner era. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) © The Associated Press In this May 18, 2017 photo, a visitor enters an exhibition entitled "Ocean Liners: Glamour, Speed, and Style" at the Peabody Essex Museum, in Salem, Mass. The new exhibition of more than 200 artworks from around the globe pays homage to the ocean liner era. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

The exhibit at the Peabody Essex Museum tells a narrative of society's love of ocean travel and how these ships evolved over the 100 years they ruled the seas. It is called "Ocean Liners: Glamor, Speed, and Style."

In this May 18, 2017 photo, a visitor looks at a model of the Queen Elizabeth at an exhibition entitled "Ocean Liners: Glamour, Speed, and Style" at the Peabody Essex Museum, in Salem, Mass. The new exhibition of more than 200 artworks from around the globe pays homage to the ocean liner era. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) © The Associated Press In this May 18, 2017 photo, a visitor looks at a model of the Queen Elizabeth at an exhibition entitled "Ocean Liners: Glamour, Speed, and Style" at the Peabody Essex Museum, in Salem, Mass. The new exhibition of more than 200 artworks from around the globe pays homage to the ocean liner era. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

From the Titanic, there is a framed advertisement for 2nd- and 3nd-class bunks available on the voyage from New York back to London. Tickets started at $36.25 for the voyage on April 20, 1912, a trip that never happened. There's also a wooden deckchair with broken caning and a piece of hand carved wooded archway, the largest surviving piece of woodwork from the Titanic.

In this May 18, 2017 photo, a visitor looks at advertising posters at an exhibition entitled "Ocean Liners: Glamour, Speed, and Style" at the Peabody Essex Museum, in Salem, Mass. The new exhibition of more than 200 artworks from around the globe pays homage to the ocean liner era. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

In this May 18, 2017 photo, a visitor looks at advertising posters at an exhibition entitled "Ocean Liners: Glamour, Speed, and Style" at the Peabody Essex Museum, in Salem, Mass. The new exhibition of more than 200 artworks from around the globe pays homage to the ocean liner era. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
© The Associated Press
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