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Iowa Rep. Rod Blum quits interview over town hall questions

Associated Press logo Associated Press 5/9/2017 By THOMAS BEAUMONT, Associated Press
Attendees hold up their red signs to show their disapproval of Rep. Rod Blum's, R-Iowa, answer to a question during a town hall at Dubuque Senior High School in Dubuque, Iowa, on Monday, May 8, 2017. (Eileen Meslar/Telegraph Herald via AP) © The Associated Press Attendees hold up their red signs to show their disapproval of Rep. Rod Blum's, R-Iowa, answer to a question during a town hall at Dubuque Senior High School in Dubuque, Iowa, on Monday, May 8, 2017. (Eileen Meslar/Telegraph Herald via AP)

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — U.S. Rep. Rod Blum stormed out of a TV interview when pressed about why he screens those who attend his public meetings. He then held a town hall, where he was met by the boos and jeers of constituents angry over his vote to repeal the 2010 federal health care law.

Rae Seaton challenges U.S. Rep. Rod Blum, R-Iowa, on his answer to her healthcare question during a town hall at Dubuque Senior High School in Dubuque, Iowa, on Monday, May 8, 2017. (Eileen Meslar/Telegraph Herald via AP) © The Associated Press Rae Seaton challenges U.S. Rep. Rod Blum, R-Iowa, on his answer to her healthcare question during a town hall at Dubuque Senior High School in Dubuque, Iowa, on Monday, May 8, 2017. (Eileen Meslar/Telegraph Herald via AP)

The second-term Iowa Republican and member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus later said he had been "ambushed" by the television news reporter who was questioning him.

People line up outside Dubuque Senior High School in Dubuque, Iowa, to protest against U.S. Rep. Rod Blum, R-Iowa, before Blum's town hall Monday, May 8, 2017. (Nicki Kohl/Telegraph Herald via AP) © The Associated Press People line up outside Dubuque Senior High School in Dubuque, Iowa, to protest against U.S. Rep. Rod Blum, R-Iowa, before Blum's town hall Monday, May 8, 2017. (Nicki Kohl/Telegraph Herald via AP)

The televised exchange in front of a group of young schoolchildren and the contentious forum that followed at Dubuque Senior High School were a glimpse at the tension facing some U.S. House members, especially since last week's vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which is also known as Obamacare.

C.J. Klenske lines up outside Dubuque Senior High School in Dubuque, Iowa, to protest against U.S. Rep. Rod Blum, R-Iowa, before Blum's town hall Monday, May 8, 2017. (Nicki Kohl/Telegraph Herald via AP) © The Associated Press C.J. Klenske lines up outside Dubuque Senior High School in Dubuque, Iowa, to protest against U.S. Rep. Rod Blum, R-Iowa, before Blum's town hall Monday, May 8, 2017. (Nicki Kohl/Telegraph Herald via AP)

"I'm done ... this is ridiculous," Blum said two minutes into an interview with Cedar Rapids station KCRG which was shot during a visit to the Dubuque Dream Center, which helps poor, mostly black, children in Blum's hometown of Dubuque.

Loras College student John Craine, left, and Clarke University student Bethanie Krause hold signs outside Dubuque Senior High School in Dubuque, Iowa, to protest against U.S. Rep. Rod Blum, R-Iowa, before Blum's town hall Monday, May 8, 2017. (Nicki Kohl/Telegraph Herald via AP) © The Associated Press Loras College student John Craine, left, and Clarke University student Bethanie Krause hold signs outside Dubuque Senior High School in Dubuque, Iowa, to protest against U.S. Rep. Rod Blum, R-Iowa, before Blum's town hall Monday, May 8, 2017. (Nicki Kohl/Telegraph Herald via AP)

Reporter Josh Scheinblum first asked Blum why he requires audience members at his public meetings to provide identification. Blum answered that it was to ensure they were from Iowa's First District, a 20-county expanse of northern and eastern Iowa that also includes Cedar Rapids, Waterloo and wide tracts of farm land.

When Scheinblum then asked Blum if he accepted campaign contributions from donors who live outside the district, though, Blum stood up and removed his clip-on microphone, saying, "I mean, he's going to sit here and just badger me...unbelievable."

During the town hall event that followed, Blum faced sometimes angry shouts from members of the audience of roughly 1,000, according to KCRG and The Washington Post.

An audience member asked Blum why he walked out of the TV interview, which was made public before the forum.

Blum replied, "Well, we get there and we were ambushed. It was very apparent that he had an agenda. It's my right to say that this interview is over," according to The Washington Post.

Blum was among the roughly 30 Freedom Caucus members who helped derail a vote in March on an earlier version of the House Republican bill to repeal and replace the health care law. Blum voted for a new version last week but he remained critical, saying he doesn't think it goes far enough in undoing the 2010 law.

"This bill is a tweak of Obamacare. It's not repeal and replace. It's not even close," Blum said, according to KCRG news video.

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Follow Tom Beaumont on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ TomBeaumont

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