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Is it really 'S-Town'? Hit podcast sparks an identity crisis

Associated Press logo Associated Press 5/9/2017 By JAY REEVES, Associated Press
In this Wednesday, May 3, 2017 photo, Jimmy Frank Hicks, left, and nephew Tyler Goodson of the hit podcast "S-Town" stand at the grave of friend John B. McLemore, who is also featured in the serialized show. Dimes, rocks and trinkets have started showing up on McLemore's headstone since the podcast debuted. But residents of the area depicted in the show are uneasy with their rural community being portrayed as a lousy place best described with an expletive. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves) © The Associated Press In this Wednesday, May 3, 2017 photo, Jimmy Frank Hicks, left, and nephew Tyler Goodson of the hit podcast "S-Town" stand at the grave of friend John B. McLemore, who is also featured in the serialized show. Dimes, rocks and trinkets have started showing up on McLemore's headstone since the podcast debuted. But residents of the area depicted in the show are uneasy with their rural community being portrayed as a lousy place best described with an expletive. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves)

WOODSTOCK, Ala. (AP) — Residents of a central Alabama community are grappling with the fallout from a hit podcast.

In this photo Wednesday, May 3, 2017 photo, Tyler Goodson of the hit podcast "S-Town" stands at the grave of friend John B. McLemore, who is also featured in the serialized show. Dimes, rocks and trinkets have started showing up on McLemore's headstone since the podcast debuted. But residents of the rural area depicted in the show are uneasy with their community being portrayed as a lousy place best described with an expletive. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves) © The Associated Press In this photo Wednesday, May 3, 2017 photo, Tyler Goodson of the hit podcast "S-Town" stands at the grave of friend John B. McLemore, who is also featured in the serialized show. Dimes, rocks and trinkets have started showing up on McLemore's headstone since the podcast debuted. But residents of the rural area depicted in the show are uneasy with their community being portrayed as a lousy place best described with an expletive. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves)

The serialized story "S-Town" has been downloaded more than 40 million times worldwide since its release last month. It's set mainly in the Bibb County towns of Woodstock and Green Pond.

But that "S'' in "S-Town" stands for a vulgar word, and residents say they'd prefer that their community be known for something else.

County Commissioner Keefe Burt's family is featured in the podcast, and he says nothing good will come from the experience.

The podcast tells the story of a man who contacted producers seeking an investigation into an alleged murder.

Tyler Goodson is one of the area residents featured in the show. He calls it a sad story, particularly for those involved.

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