You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Jackie Evancho, Mormon Tabernacle Choir perform at inaugural

Associated Press logo Associated Press 1/20/2017 By JOCELYN NOVECK and MESFIN FEKADU, Associated Press
Singer Jackie Evancho arrives for the Presidential Inauguration of Donald Trump at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, January 20, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / SAUL LOEB © The Associated Press Singer Jackie Evancho arrives for the Presidential Inauguration of Donald Trump at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, January 20, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / SAUL LOEB

WASHINGTON (AP) — The new president called out "Great job, Jackie!" after 16-year-old Jackie Evancho delivered a soft-voiced rendition of the national anthem at Friday's swearing-in ceremony.

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence listen to the National Anthem sung by Jackie Evancho with former President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky) © The Associated Press President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence listen to the National Anthem sung by Jackie Evancho with former President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

The Mormon Tabernacle Choir sang "America the Beautiful," and the Missouri State University Chorale sang "Now We Belong," in a ceremony that featured decidedly less star power than in 2013. At President Barack Obama's second inauguration, Beyonce sang the anthem, James Taylor sang "America the Beautiful," and Kelly Clarkson sang a powerful "My Country, 'Tis of Thee."

Singer Jackie Evancho arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, for the presidential inauguration of Donald Trump. (Saul Loeb/Pool Photo via AP) © The Associated Press Singer Jackie Evancho arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, for the presidential inauguration of Donald Trump. (Saul Loeb/Pool Photo via AP)

The various inauguration performances have become a hotly debated topic and have reflected the obvious divisions in the country following the election of Donald Trump, who is deeply unpopular in Hollywood.

Singer Jackie Evancho arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, for the presidential inauguration of Donald Trump. (Saul Loeb/Pool Photo via AP) © The Associated Press Singer Jackie Evancho arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, for the presidential inauguration of Donald Trump. (Saul Loeb/Pool Photo via AP)

A number of top artists declined the opportunity to perform, and Broadway singer Jennifer Holliday even said she'd received death threats before she pulled out of her scheduled appearance.

Members of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir wait for the swearing in of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the Untied States during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Friday, Jan. 20, 2017 (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky) © The Associated Press Members of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir wait for the swearing in of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the Untied States during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Friday, Jan. 20, 2017 (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

An official Lincoln Memorial concert on Thursday attended by Trump was heavy on country music, with performances by Toby Keith and Lee Greenwood. Also performing were the bands 3 Doors Down and The Piano Guys.

Members of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir wait for the swearing in of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the Untied States during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Friday, Jan. 20, 2017 (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky) © The Associated Press Members of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir wait for the swearing in of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the Untied States during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Friday, Jan. 20, 2017 (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

By contrast, at a Lincoln Memorial concert in 2009 for Obama, performers included Bruce Springsteen, Beyonce, U2, Jon Bon Jovi and Stevie Wonder, with actors like Tom Hanks and Denzel Washington giving readings.

Members of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir sit in the rain waiting for the swearing in of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States to begin during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Friday, Jan. 20, 2017 (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) © The Associated Press Members of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir sit in the rain waiting for the swearing in of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States to begin during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Friday, Jan. 20, 2017 (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

At Trump's three inaugural balls Friday night, performers were to include Tony Orlando, Josh Weathers and the Rockettes. Also announced was soul artist Sam Moore, 81, who sang "America the Beautiful" at Thursday's concert.

Singer Sam Moore performs during a pre-Inaugural "Make America Great Again! Welcome Celebration" at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip) © The Associated Press Singer Sam Moore performs during a pre-Inaugural "Make America Great Again! Welcome Celebration" at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Moore was also on the guest list at one of the more high-profile "alternative" gatherings around town: the quadrennial bash thrown by the Creative Coalition, a nonpartisan arts advocacy group.

The party was being headlined by the Grammy-winning rock group Blues Traveler. The guest list included a number of TV actors: Tim Daly, John Leguizamo, Christina Hendricks, Cheryl Hines, Tim Allen and more.

On Saturday, artists Janelle Monae and Maxwell were scheduled to perform at the Women's March on Washington. Also slated to attend were Katy Perry, Julianne Moore, Scarlett Johansson, Amy Schumer and Cher.

And on Thursday night, the Peace Ball, organized by progressive activist Andy Shallal, drew some 3,000 people to the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture, where they danced and watched Solange Knowles and Esperanza Spalding perform.

Guests included actors Danny Glover, Fran Drescher and Ellen Page. Civil rights activist Angela Davis and author Alice Walker were also in attendance.

Glover addressed the fact that although the event was described as a nonpartisan celebration of successes in recent years in areas like health care, climate change and marriage equality, the room was filled with people unhappy with the results of the election.

"We can't just sit and lick our wounds," Glover said. "Our work is cut out for us. We have to make some hard choices."

___

Fekadu reported from New York.

AdChoices
AdChoices
AdChoices
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon