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Jets zip through narrow Star Wars Canyon, drawing visitors

Associated Press logo Associated Press 4/11/2017 By BEN MARGOT and JULIE WATSON, Associated Press
In this Feb. 27, 2017, photo an F-15E Strike Eagle from Seymour Johnson AFB in North Carolina flies out of the nicknamed Star Wars Canyon turning toward the Panamint range over Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ben Margot) © The Associated Press In this Feb. 27, 2017, photo an F-15E Strike Eagle from Seymour Johnson AFB in North Carolina flies out of the nicknamed Star Wars Canyon turning toward the Panamint range over Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK, California (AP) — Military planes roaring over national parks in the United States have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers.

In this Feb. 27, 2017, photo, Lt. Cmdr. Ian "Elf" Kibler of the VX-9 Vampire squadron from Naval Air Weapons Station, China Lake, banks his F/A-18E Super Hornet through the nicknamed Star Wars Canyon in Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ben Margot) © The Associated Press In this Feb. 27, 2017, photo, Lt. Cmdr. Ian "Elf" Kibler of the VX-9 Vampire squadron from Naval Air Weapons Station, China Lake, banks his F/A-18E Super Hornet through the nicknamed Star Wars Canyon in Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

But in California, the unusually close-up view of jets zipping through a narrow gorge in Death Valley National Park has become such a popular spot that the National Park Service is considering making it an attraction with informational signs about the training dating back to World War II.

In this photo taken Feb. 28, 2017, photographer Jason O. Watson waits on a cliff overlooking the nicknamed Star Wars Canyon in Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles.(AP Photo/Ben Margot) © The Associated Press In this photo taken Feb. 28, 2017, photographer Jason O. Watson waits on a cliff overlooking the nicknamed Star Wars Canyon in Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles.(AP Photo/Ben Margot)

The canyon earned the nickname Star Wars Canyon because it resembles "Star Wars" character Luke Skywalker's home planet of Tatooine.

In this Feb. 27, 2017, photo, an F/A-18E Super Hornet from VFA-24 squadron at NAS Lemoore banks in front of the Panamint range while exiting the nicknamed Star Wars Canyon on the Jedi transition over Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ben Margot) © The Associated Press In this Feb. 27, 2017, photo, an F/A-18E Super Hornet from VFA-24 squadron at NAS Lemoore banks in front of the Panamint range while exiting the nicknamed Star Wars Canyon on the Jedi transition over Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

The park is a four-hour drive from Los Angeles. This year, it has been drawing "Star Wars" fans celebrating the 40th anniversary of the original movie. Some scenes from the 1977 film were shot on the park's eastern side.

In this Feb. 28, 2017, photo, Thomas "Tom" P. McGee of the VX-9 Vampire squadron from Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, flies an F/A-18E Super Hornet toward the sun over Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ben Margot) © The Associated Press In this Feb. 28, 2017, photo, Thomas "Tom" P. McGee of the VX-9 Vampire squadron from Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, flies an F/A-18E Super Hornet toward the sun over Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
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