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'Perfect Storm' ship about to become part of artificial reef

Associated Press logo Associated Press 5/10/2017
FILE- In this May 30, 2000, file photo, U.S. Coast Guard Lt. William Moeller of Northford, Conn., poses for a photo in front of the USS Tamaroa. Moeller was aboard the Tamaroa during the 1991 rescue of five Air National Guardsmen who ditched their helicopter as they were trying to rescue the crew of a fishing boat during a fierce storm. The storm and the events surrounding it were recalled in the book "The Perfect Storm" which was made into a motion picture. Officials say they plan to sink the ship Wednesday, May 10, 2017, off the New Jersey and Delaware coasts so it can become part of an artificial reef. (AP Photo/Ed Bailey, File) © The Associated Press FILE- In this May 30, 2000, file photo, U.S. Coast Guard Lt. William Moeller of Northford, Conn., poses for a photo in front of the USS Tamaroa. Moeller was aboard the Tamaroa during the 1991 rescue of five Air National Guardsmen who ditched their helicopter as they were trying to rescue the crew of a fishing boat during a fierce storm. The storm and the events surrounding it were recalled in the book "The Perfect Storm" which was made into a motion picture. Officials say they plan to sink the ship Wednesday, May 10, 2017, off the New Jersey and Delaware coasts so it can become part of an artificial reef. (AP Photo/Ed Bailey, File)

CAPE MAY, N.J. (AP) — The ship made famous in the book and subsequent film "The Perfect Storm" is about to be intentionally sunk off the New Jersey and Delaware coasts so it can become part of an artificial reef.

The sinking of the Tamaroa, a 205-foot (62-meter) Coast Guard vessel, initially was scheduled to take place several months ago, but was repeatedly delayed by rough seas and other related issues.

Officials say they plan to sink it Wednesday morning about 33 nautical miles (61 kilometers) off the coast of Cape May, New Jersey.

A tugboat began hauling the Tamaroa from a Norfolk, Virginia, shipyard on Monday.

The Tamaroa was first commission by the U.S. Navy in 1934 under the name Zuni, which during World War II helped tow damaged vessels across the war-torn Pacific Ocean.

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