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Steve Earle enlists Miranda, Willie to revisit outlaw music

Associated Press logo Associated Press 6/22/2017 By KRISTIN M. HALL, Associated Press
In this June 8, 2017, photo, Grammy-winning songwriter Steve Earle poses in a rehearsal studio in Nashville, Tenn. When Earle first arrived in Nashville from Austin in the ‘70s, he was the young gun among a group of veteran singer-songwriters. It was the beginning of the outlaw movement, which Earle attempts to revisit on his new record, "So You Wannabe An Outlaw." (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey) © The Associated Press In this June 8, 2017, photo, Grammy-winning songwriter Steve Earle poses in a rehearsal studio in Nashville, Tenn. When Earle first arrived in Nashville from Austin in the ‘70s, he was the young gun among a group of veteran singer-songwriters. It was the beginning of the outlaw movement, which Earle attempts to revisit on his new record, "So You Wannabe An Outlaw." (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A decade ago, alt-country rocker Steve Earle and country star Miranda Lambert shared writing credit on a hit from her debut album in 2005. But the two Grammy-winning performers never got into a writers' room together until last year.

In this June 8, 2017, photo, Grammy-winning songwriter Steve Earle poses in a rehearsal studio in Nashville, Tenn. When Earle first arrived in Nashville from Austin in the ‘70s, he was the young gun among a group of veteran singer-songwriters. It was the beginning of the outlaw movement, which Earle attempts to revisit on his new record, "So You Wannabe An Outlaw." (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey) © The Associated Press In this June 8, 2017, photo, Grammy-winning songwriter Steve Earle poses in a rehearsal studio in Nashville, Tenn. When Earle first arrived in Nashville from Austin in the ‘70s, he was the young gun among a group of veteran singer-songwriters. It was the beginning of the outlaw movement, which Earle attempts to revisit on his new record, "So You Wannabe An Outlaw." (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Lambert and Earle penned a twangy breakup duet for Earle's new album, "So You Wannabe An Outlaw," which revisits Earle's history as a student of the outlaw country movement. He also enlisted help from icon Willie Nelson on the title track, which argues that being an outlaw meant "you can't ever go home."

In this June 8, 2017, photo, Grammy-winning songwriter Steve Earle plays his guitar in a rehearsal studio in Nashville, Tenn. When Earle first arrived in Nashville from Austin in the ‘70s, he was the young gun among a group of veteran singer-songwriters. It was the beginning of the outlaw movement, which Earle attempts to revisit on his new record, "So You Wannabe An Outlaw." (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey) © The Associated Press In this June 8, 2017, photo, Grammy-winning songwriter Steve Earle plays his guitar in a rehearsal studio in Nashville, Tenn. When Earle first arrived in Nashville from Austin in the ‘70s, he was the young gun among a group of veteran singer-songwriters. It was the beginning of the outlaw movement, which Earle attempts to revisit on his new record, "So You Wannabe An Outlaw." (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Earle said he wanted to rehabilitate the term "outlaw" after realizing too many people still think it was all about booze and drugs, and not about the art of a great song.

This cover image released by Warner Bros. Records shows, "So You Wannabe An Outlaw," by Steve Earle. (Warner Bros. Records via AP) © The Associated Press This cover image released by Warner Bros. Records shows, "So You Wannabe An Outlaw," by Steve Earle. (Warner Bros. Records via AP)

Earle's album was released last week.

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