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To celebrate inaugural or not? Trump critics are divided

Associated Press logo Associated Press 1/7/2017 By NANCY BENAC, Associated Press
FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2016, file photo, construction continues for the Inauguration and swearing-in ceremonies for President-elect Donald Trump on the Capitol steps in Washington. It’s typically an unquestioned honor to participate in the inauguration of an American president. This time, though, it’s different. The sharp divisions over Donald Trump’s election have politicians, celebrities and even high school students debating whether taking part in the inauguration is a political act that demonstrates support for the new president and his agenda or a nonpartisan tribute to democratic traditions and the peaceful transfer of power. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2016, file photo, construction continues for the Inauguration and swearing-in ceremonies for President-elect Donald Trump on the Capitol steps in Washington. It’s typically an unquestioned honor to participate in the inauguration of an American president. This time, though, it’s different. The sharp divisions over Donald Trump’s election have politicians, celebrities and even high school students debating whether taking part in the inauguration is a political act that demonstrates support for the new president and his agenda or a nonpartisan tribute to democratic traditions and the peaceful transfer of power. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's typically an honor to participate in the inauguration of an American president.

FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2016, file photo, a model of the White House is displayed on a giant planning map during a media tour highlighting inaugural preparations being made by the Joint Task Force-National Capital Region for military and civilian planners at the DC Armory in Washington. It’s typically an unquestioned honor to participate in the inauguration of an American president. This time, though, it’s different. The sharp divisions over Donald Trump’s election have politicians, celebrities and even high school students debating whether taking part in the inauguration is a political act that demonstrates support for the new president and his agenda or a nonpartisan tribute to democratic traditions and the peaceful transfer of power.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2016, file photo, a model of the White House is displayed on a giant planning map during a media tour highlighting inaugural preparations being made by the Joint Task Force-National Capital Region for military and civilian planners at the DC Armory in Washington. It’s typically an unquestioned honor to participate in the inauguration of an American president. This time, though, it’s different. The sharp divisions over Donald Trump’s election have politicians, celebrities and even high school students debating whether taking part in the inauguration is a political act that demonstrates support for the new president and his agenda or a nonpartisan tribute to democratic traditions and the peaceful transfer of power.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Who wouldn't want to be part of such a historic event?

FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2016, file photo, the Mormon Tabernacle Choir of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, sings in the Conference Center at the morning session of the two-day Mormon church conference in Salt Lake City. It’s typically an unquestioned honor to participate in the inauguration of an American president. This time, though, it’s different. The sharp divisions over Donald Trump’s election have politicians, celebrities and even high school students debating whether taking part in the inauguration is a political act that demonstrates support for the new president and his agenda or a nonpartisan tribute to democratic traditions and the peaceful transfer of power. (AP Photo/George Frey, File) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2016, file photo, the Mormon Tabernacle Choir of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, sings in the Conference Center at the morning session of the two-day Mormon church conference in Salt Lake City. It’s typically an unquestioned honor to participate in the inauguration of an American president. This time, though, it’s different. The sharp divisions over Donald Trump’s election have politicians, celebrities and even high school students debating whether taking part in the inauguration is a political act that demonstrates support for the new president and his agenda or a nonpartisan tribute to democratic traditions and the peaceful transfer of power. (AP Photo/George Frey, File)

This time, though, it's different.

The sharp divisions over Donald Trump's election have politicians, celebrities and even high school students debating this question: Is taking part in the inauguration a political act that demonstrates support for the new president and his agenda, or is it a nonpartisan tribute to democratic traditions and the peaceful transfer of power.

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