You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Triforium, LA's once widely mocked artwork, may get makeover

Associated Press logo Associated Press 2/11/2017 By JOHN ROGERS, Associated Press
In this Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017, photo members of the Triforium project, from left, Jona Bechtolt, Claire Evans, Tom Carroll, and Tanner Blackman, pose for a photo with Joseph L. Young's Triforium a "polyphonoptic" public sculpture at the Fletcher Bowron Square downtown Los Angeles. For 40 years Joseph Young festooned public buildings, open spaces and private places across his adopted city of Los Angeles with dozens of brilliant, larger-than-life artworks. Mocked for 42 years as pointless and silly looking, the six-story, space-age-like structure may finally get a second chance, thanks to a $100,000 innovation grant.. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes) © The Associated Press In this Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017, photo members of the Triforium project, from left, Jona Bechtolt, Claire Evans, Tom Carroll, and Tanner Blackman, pose for a photo with Joseph L. Young's Triforium a "polyphonoptic" public sculpture at the Fletcher Bowron Square downtown Los Angeles. For 40 years Joseph Young festooned public buildings, open spaces and private places across his adopted city of Los Angeles with dozens of brilliant, larger-than-life artworks. Mocked for 42 years as pointless and silly looking, the six-story, space-age-like structure may finally get a second chance, thanks to a $100,000 innovation grant.. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — For 40 years, Joseph Young festooned public buildings, open spaces and private places across his adopted city of Los Angeles with colorful mosaics, larger-than-life murals and towering sculptures.

In this Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017, photo members of the Triforium project, from left, Tom Carroll, Claire Evans, Jona Bechtolt, and Tanner Blackman, pose for a photo with Joseph L. Young's Triforium a "polyphonoptic" public sculpture at the Fletcher Bowron Square downtown Los Angeles. For 40 years Joseph Young festooned public buildings, open spaces and private places across his adopted city of Los Angeles with dozens of brilliant, larger-than-life artworks. Mocked for 42 years as pointless and silly looking, the six-story, space-age-like structure may finally get a second chance, thanks to a $100,000 innovation grant. © The Associated Press In this Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017, photo members of the Triforium project, from left, Tom Carroll, Claire Evans, Jona Bechtolt, and Tanner Blackman, pose for a photo with Joseph L. Young's Triforium a "polyphonoptic" public sculpture at the Fletcher Bowron Square downtown Los Angeles. For 40 years Joseph Young festooned public buildings, open spaces and private places across his adopted city of Los Angeles with dozens of brilliant, larger-than-life artworks. Mocked for 42 years as pointless and silly looking, the six-story, space-age-like structure may finally get a second chance, thanks to a $100,000 innovation grant.

But the one work the artist is remembered for is The Triforium, something people have been making fun of since its 1975 debut.

In this Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017, photo members of the Triforium project, from left, Tanner Blackman, Tom Carroll, Claire Evans, and Jona Bechtolt, pose for a photo with Joseph L. Young's Triforium a "polyphonoptic" public sculpture at the Fletcher Bowron Square downtown Los Angeles. For 40 years Joseph Young festooned public buildings, open spaces and private places across his adopted city of Los Angeles with dozens of brilliant, larger-than-life artworks. Mocked for 42 years as pointless and silly looking, the six-story, space-age-like structure may finally get a second chance, thanks to a $100,000 innovation grant. © The Associated Press In this Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017, photo members of the Triforium project, from left, Tanner Blackman, Tom Carroll, Claire Evans, and Jona Bechtolt, pose for a photo with Joseph L. Young's Triforium a "polyphonoptic" public sculpture at the Fletcher Bowron Square downtown Los Angeles. For 40 years Joseph Young festooned public buildings, open spaces and private places across his adopted city of Los Angeles with dozens of brilliant, larger-than-life artworks. Mocked for 42 years as pointless and silly looking, the six-story, space-age-like structure may finally get a second chance, thanks to a $100,000 innovation grant.

Pointy and kind of strange-looking, the structure stands six stories tall. It's covered with 1,494 colorful lights that once blinked in time to music.

This Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017 photo shows Joseph L. Young's Triforium a "polyphonoptic" public sculpture at the Fletcher Bowron Square downtown Los Angeles. For 40 years Joseph Young festooned public buildings, open spaces and private places across his adopted city of Los Angeles with dozens of brilliant, larger-than-life artworks. Mocked for 42 years as pointless and silly looking, the six-story, space-age-like structure may finally get a second chance, thanks to a $100,000 innovation grant. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes) © The Associated Press This Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017 photo shows Joseph L. Young's Triforium a "polyphonoptic" public sculpture at the Fletcher Bowron Square downtown Los Angeles. For 40 years Joseph Young festooned public buildings, open spaces and private places across his adopted city of Los Angeles with dozens of brilliant, larger-than-life artworks. Mocked for 42 years as pointless and silly looking, the six-story, space-age-like structure may finally get a second chance, thanks to a $100,000 innovation grant. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

But the music stopped working long ago, and most of the lights burned out.

In this Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017, photo members of the Triforium project, from left, Tanner Blackman, Claire Evans, Jona Bechtolt and Tom Carroll, pose for a photo with Joseph L. Young's Triforium a "polyphonoptic" public sculpture at the Fletcher Bowron Square downtown Los Angeles. For 40 years Joseph Young festooned public buildings, open spaces and private places across his adopted city of Los Angeles with dozens of brilliant, larger-than-life artworks. Mocked for 42 years as pointless and silly looking, the six-story, space-age-like structure may finally get a second chance, thanks to a $100,000 innovation grant. © The Associated Press In this Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017, photo members of the Triforium project, from left, Tanner Blackman, Claire Evans, Jona Bechtolt and Tom Carroll, pose for a photo with Joseph L. Young's Triforium a "polyphonoptic" public sculpture at the Fletcher Bowron Square downtown Los Angeles. For 40 years Joseph Young festooned public buildings, open spaces and private places across his adopted city of Los Angeles with dozens of brilliant, larger-than-life artworks. Mocked for 42 years as pointless and silly looking, the six-story, space-age-like structure may finally get a second chance, thanks to a $100,000 innovation grant.

Now, The Triforium is getting a second chance, thanks to four admirers who won a $100,000 innovation grant.

They're confident they can turn it into what the now-deceased Young had envisioned. The artist's children say they're thrilled.

AdChoices
AdChoices
AdChoices
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon