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Wish you were here? V&A museum puts Pink Floyd on show

Associated Press logo Associated Press 5/9/2017
Mannequins in 'a lightbulb suit' are photographed in front of a 'Learning to Fly' display at the Pink Floyd exhibition 'Their Mortal Remains' at the V&A museum in west London, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, an immersive, experimental journey through Pink Floyd's world of over 350 objects and artefacts from the band. The exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of the band's first album, 'The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn' and officially opens to the public on 13 May (Photo by Joel Ryan/Invision/AP) © The Associated Press Mannequins in 'a lightbulb suit' are photographed in front of a 'Learning to Fly' display at the Pink Floyd exhibition 'Their Mortal Remains' at the V&A museum in west London, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, an immersive, experimental journey through Pink Floyd's world of over 350 objects and artefacts from the band. The exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of the band's first album, 'The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn' and officially opens to the public on 13 May (Photo by Joel Ryan/Invision/AP)

LONDON (AP) — The Victoria & Albert Museum's new exhibition is a psychedelic time capsule of a show devoted to the band Pink Floyd, complete with floating pigs, surreal animations and trippy projections.

The inflatable pig above Battersea power station is photographed among art for the Pink Floyd exhibition 'Their Mortal Remains' at the V&A museum in west London, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, an immersive, experimental journey through Pink Floyd's world of over 350 objects and artefacts from the band. The exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of the band's first album, 'The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn' and officially opens to the public on 13 May (Photo by Joel Ryan/Invision/AP) © The Associated Press The inflatable pig above Battersea power station is photographed among art for the Pink Floyd exhibition 'Their Mortal Remains' at the V&A museum in west London, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, an immersive, experimental journey through Pink Floyd's world of over 350 objects and artefacts from the band. The exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of the band's first album, 'The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn' and officially opens to the public on 13 May (Photo by Joel Ryan/Invision/AP)

But it's not the visuals, or the group's experimental music, that identifies the exhibition in London as an ode to a vanished time. It's the economics.

A museum worker poses in front of the metal heads from The Pink Floyd's Division Bell album at the band's exhibition, 'Their Mortal Remains' at the V&A museum in west London, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, an immersive, experimental journey through Pink Floyd's world of over 350 objects and artefacts from the band. The exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of the band's first album, 'The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn' and officially opens to the public on 13 May (Photo by Joel Ryan/Invision/AP) © The Associated Press A museum worker poses in front of the metal heads from The Pink Floyd's Division Bell album at the band's exhibition, 'Their Mortal Remains' at the V&A museum in west London, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, an immersive, experimental journey through Pink Floyd's world of over 350 objects and artefacts from the band. The exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of the band's first album, 'The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn' and officially opens to the public on 13 May (Photo by Joel Ryan/Invision/AP)

Pink Floyd was given limitless studio time to create sprawling albums that sold in the tens of millions. They staged multimedia shows so technically ambitious that one tour's set took eight days to assemble.

The inflatable teacher from Roger Water's tour of 'The Wall' is photographed among art for the Pink Floyd exhibition 'Their Mortal Remains' at the V&A museum in west London, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, an immersive, experimental journey through Pink Floyd's world of over 350 objects and artefacts from the band. The exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of the band's first album, 'The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn' and officially opens to the public on 13 May (Photo by Joel Ryan/Invision/AP) © The Associated Press The inflatable teacher from Roger Water's tour of 'The Wall' is photographed among art for the Pink Floyd exhibition 'Their Mortal Remains' at the V&A museum in west London, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, an immersive, experimental journey through Pink Floyd's world of over 350 objects and artefacts from the band. The exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of the band's first album, 'The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn' and officially opens to the public on 13 May (Photo by Joel Ryan/Invision/AP)

Aubrey "Po" Powell, who helped design the band's most famous album covers, said Tuesday the exhibition is a celebration of a vanished "golden period" when musical renegades could flourish.

A man listens to an audio display at the Pink Floyd exhibition 'Their Mortal Remains' at the V&A museum in west London, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, an immersive, experimental journey through Pink Floyd's world of over 350 objects and artefacts from the band. The exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of the band's first album, 'The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn' and officially opens to the public on 13 May (Photo by Joel Ryan/Invision/AP) © The Associated Press A man listens to an audio display at the Pink Floyd exhibition 'Their Mortal Remains' at the V&A museum in west London, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, an immersive, experimental journey through Pink Floyd's world of over 350 objects and artefacts from the band. The exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of the band's first album, 'The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn' and officially opens to the public on 13 May (Photo by Joel Ryan/Invision/AP)

The show opens Saturday and runs to Oct. 1.

A letter from one of Pink Floyd's original members Syd Barrett to his girlfriend Jenny Spires, is photographed on display at the V&A museum in west London, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, from the Pink Floyd exhibition 'Their Mortal Remains', an immersive, experimental journey through the band's world of over 350 objects and artefacts. The exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of the band's first album, 'The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn' and officially opens to the public on 13 May (Photo by Joel Ryan/Invision/AP)

A letter from one of Pink Floyd's original members Syd Barrett to his girlfriend Jenny Spires, is photographed on display at the V&A museum in west London, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, from the Pink Floyd exhibition 'Their Mortal Remains', an immersive, experimental journey through the band's world of over 350 objects and artefacts. The exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of the band's first album, 'The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn' and officially opens to the public on 13 May (Photo by Joel Ryan/Invision/AP)
© The Associated Press
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