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Central US to face ongoing severe weather threat through end of week

AccuWeather logo AccuWeather 4 days ago Alex Sosnowski
Center for Severe Weather Research intern Hunter Anderson takes photographs of a supercell thunderstorm, May 10, 2017 in Quanah, Texas. © Drew Angerer/Getty Images Center for Severe Weather Research intern Hunter Anderson takes photographs of a supercell thunderstorm, May 10, 2017 in Quanah, Texas.

The severe weather threat will continue over a portion of the central United States that was hit hard by violent storms earlier this week.

Following multiple days under the threat of tornadoes, parts of Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and Missouri will be at risk for severe thunderstorms that include the potential for a couple of isolated tornadoes on Friday.

The storm system producing the severe weather will begin to advance eastward on Friday, but it will not move fast; some communities will deal with yet another day of watching the skies and closely monitoring severe weather bulletins.

The new storms could be a major disruption to communities cleaning up and recovering from the violent storms this week.

Once again, the storms will target a large part of the Interstate 35 corridor, including Dallas, Oklahoma City and Wichita, Kansas.

"The storm threat will extend as far south as part of the Big Bend area of the Rio Grande River in southern Texas to northern Missouri, including the Kansas City metro area," according to AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Kristina Pydynowski.

Other cities at risk for severe storms on Friday include Tulsa, Oklahoma; Fort Smith, Arkansas; Topeka, Kansas; and Joplin and Springfield, Missouri.

"Along with the potential for isolated tornadoes, the greatest threats from the severe thunderstorms will be for damaging wind gusts, hail and flash flooding on Friday and into Friday night," Pydynowski said.

Since the storms may not reach St. Louis until very late at night, they are likely to be less intense than those farther to the west earlier Friday evening. There is still the potential for heavy, gusty storms reaching the St. Louis metro area, however.

"The storm system will continue to produce areas of intense rainfall and consequential flooding," according to AccuWeather Chief Meteorologist Elliot Abrams.

Some of the heavy rainfall will overlap the severe thunderstorm threat area, while a portion of the heavy rain will fall well north of strongest storms.

Areas from central Texas to central Iowa will be at risk for flash, urban and stream flooding through Friday.

On Saturday, the risk of flooding will continue over parts of Texas but will press eastward across the middle and lower Mississippi valleys, along with the potential for gusty and perhaps locally severe thunderstorms.

The risk of severe storms will diminish from Dallas to Kansas City on Saturday. Most of this corridor will be free of rain and storms from Saturday through Sunday afternoon.

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