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Ontario's big blizzard and more of Canada's worst weather

Love Exploring Logo By Rachel Truman of Love Exploring | Slide 2 of 33: Three minutes of lethal 206-259-mile-per-hour (331-417km/h) winds left the province of Saskatchewan with a 40-year-long repair bill, when the so-called “Regina Cyclone” tore into the city of Regina on 30 June 1912. The severe storm was, in fact, an F4-rated tornado and it ripped through six blocks of downtown Regina, destroying 500 buildings and leaving a quarter of the city’s population homeless in its wake. Twenty-eight people were killed in what is thought to have been one of the country’s deadliest storms.

1912: Cyclone Regina, Saskatchewan

Three minutes of lethal 206-259-mile-per-hour (331-417km/h) winds left the province of Saskatchewan with a 40-year-long repair bill, when the so-called “Regina Cyclone” tore into the city of Regina on 30 June 1912. The severe storm was, in fact, an F4-rated tornado and it ripped through six blocks of downtown Regina, destroying 500 buildings and leaving a quarter of the city’s population homeless in its wake. Twenty-eight people were killed in what is thought to have been one of the country’s deadliest storms.

© COLE BURSTON / Contributor/Getty

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