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This part of America is expected to have the most days of extreme precipitation in the coming years

Stacker Logo By Gina-Marie Cheeseman of Stacker | Slide 1 of 51: Climate change will not just affect temperature, it will also affect how much precipitation towns, counties, states, and countries receive. Wet regions are projected by the National Climate Assessment to generally become wetter, with rising overall air and water temperatures increasing heavy downpours across the U.S., according to the Fourth National Climate Assessment. Studies widely show that across the country, heavy precipitation events are increasing—and projected to continue doing so. Over the last century, there has been a 10% increase in annual precipitation in Pennsylvania, for example, with experts predicting a continued increase in precipitation and flooding through mid-century. By 2050, precipitation in Pennsylvania is expected to increase by 8% annually, with 14% of that occurring in winter. Average annual precipitation in New York has similarly increased since 1900; throughout the 21st century, winter precipitation in the state is projected to continue to rise while higher temperatures mean more rain and less snow. To determine which U.S. counties will see the most extreme precipitation days in 2050, Stacker consulted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention & National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, which uses a 30-year rolling average to calculate the projected amount of days with extreme precipitation. These predictions were last updated in December of 2018. Counties are ranked by low emission days of extreme precipitation in 2050. The number of extreme precipitation days is relative to days in a year, with the measure calculated annually and representing a 30-year rolling average. Keep reading to see if your own home county is projected to be among those with the most extreme precipitation days in 2050. You may also like:  Dramatic satellite observations that show the true scale of Arctic change

Counties projected to have the most extreme precipitation days in 2050

Climate change will not just affect temperature, it will also affect how much precipitation towns, counties, states, and countries receive. Wet regions are projected by the National Climate Assessment to generally become wetter, with rising overall air and water temperatures increasing heavy downpours across the U.S., according to the Fourth National Climate Assessment. Studies widely show that across the country, heavy precipitation events are increasing—and projected to continue doing so.

Over the last century, there has been a 10% increase in annual precipitation in Pennsylvania, for example, with experts predicting a continued increase in precipitation and flooding through mid-century. By 2050, precipitation in Pennsylvania is expected to increase by 8% annually, with 14% of that occurring in winter. Average annual precipitation in New York has similarly increased since 1900; throughout the 21st century, winter precipitation in the state is projected to continue to rise while higher temperatures mean more rain and less snow.

To determine which U.S. counties will see the most extreme precipitation days in 2050, Stacker consulted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention & National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, which uses a 30-year rolling average to calculate the projected amount of days with extreme precipitation. These predictions were last updated in December of 2018.

Counties are ranked by low emission days of extreme precipitation in 2050. The number of extreme precipitation days is relative to days in a year, with the measure calculated annually and representing a 30-year rolling average.

Keep reading to see if your own home county is projected to be among those with the most extreme precipitation days in 2050.

You may also like: Dramatic satellite observations that show the true scale of Arctic change

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