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FILE - In this Oct. 3, 2013, file photo, Orange County district attorney Jim Woodall arrives at the Orange County District Court in Hillsborough, N.C. The complex schemes to get first dibs on teenage athletes with pro potential can resemble the drug trade. Laws were enacted as a deterrent to those providing college athletes with improper benefits that jeopardize their eligibility, and to punish violators for unethical conduct. But state-level investigators and prosecutors face a dilemma of how these cases fit in when violent crimes and high-level felonies fill court schedules as clear priorities. “If (lawmakers) decide something’s a high-level felony, that’s going to get more attention,” said Woodall, a North Carolina district attorney whose office got a rare criminal conviction under the law this year. “And in these athlete agent cases, what we’re usually looking at is a Class I felony, which is the lowest we have in North Carolina. (Chris Seward/The News & Observer via AP, File)

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FILE - In this Oct. 3, 2013, file photo, Orange County district attorney Jim Woodall arrives at the Orange County District Court in Hillsborough, N.C. The complex schemes to get first dibs on teenage athletes with pro potential can resemble the drug trade. Laws were enacted as a deterrent to those providing college athletes with improper benefits that jeopardize their eligibility, and to punish violators for unethical conduct. But state-level investigators and prosecutors face a dilemma of how these cases fit in when violent crimes and high-level felonies fill court schedules as clear priorities. “If (lawmakers) decide something’s a high-level felony, that’s going to get more attention,” said Woodall, a North Carolina district attorney whose office got a rare criminal conviction under the law this year. “And in these athlete agent cases, what we’re usually looking at is a Class I felony, which is the lowest we have in North Carolina. (Chris Seward/The News & Observer via AP, File)

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