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'They didn't complain!': Bizarre moment Scott Morrison compares Christians who were slaughtered in Soviet Russia to Australians in a rousing speech at an evangelical conference

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 10/07/2019 Aidan Wondracz For Daily Mail Australia and Australian Associated Press

a group of people posing for the camera: Prime minister Scott Morrison (pictured with his wife Jenny at an Easter Sunday service at Horizon Church earlier this year) has vowed to fight for religious freedom laws during an impassioned speech at a Hillsong conference © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Prime minister Scott Morrison (pictured with his wife Jenny at an Easter Sunday service at Horizon Church earlier this year) has vowed to fight for religious freedom laws during an impassioned speech at a Hillsong conference Prime minister Scott Morrison compared Christian missionaries in Soviet Russia to Australians at the Hillsong conference in Sydney.

Mr Morrison said that the Christians who were persecuted by the highly oppressive regime 'didn't complain', at Qudos Bank Arena on Tuesday. 

He promised to reform religious freedom laws but also appeared to criticise those demanding changes during an impassioned speech. 

'You didn’t hear stories about them complaining about their rights,' he said in front of a 21,000 strong crowd.

'They were just loving in that situation and they were out there for God. That was their response and this country needs more love and less judgment.'  

Communist Russia adopted an atheist ideology and millions of Christians were slaughtered because they were seen as a threat to State.  

a group of people on a stage in front of a crowd: Mr Morrison indicated the government would strongly push to make it unlawful to discriminate someone based on their religious beliefs at Sydney's Qudos Bank Arena on Tuesday (pictured, an overview of a Hillsong conference - not the same one Mr Morrison attended)

Mr Morrison indicated the government would strongly push to make it unlawful to discriminate someone based on their religious beliefs at Sydney's Qudos Bank Arena on Tuesday (pictured, an overview of a Hillsong conference - not the same one Mr Morrison attended)
© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited

Mr Morrison said he would continue to work for a religious freedom law. 

'Of course we will do what we need to do from a legislative point of view,' he said.

'But what all that boils down to is the culture in this country. It’s not the laws that make freedom of religion work, it’s the culture that accepts it.'  

Under the proposed, it will be unlawful for a person to discriminate someone based on their religious beliefs. 

Responding to a question from Hillsong founder and senior pastor Brian Houston last night, Mr Morrison talked about faith as an identity.

'So I speak about my faith ... because I want everyone in this place to feel comfortable talking about faith in this country,' he said.

'It's not a political agenda, it's who we are.'

Mr Morrison is a frequent visitor at Horizon Church and often attends the Hillsong conferences.

Standing alongside his wife Jenny, he called for more prayer and encouraged Christians to show the love of God.

He called for humility among leaders and urged followers of the faith to move towards

The push for the religious freedom bill is causing tension within the Coalition party room, with some conservative MPs threatening to vote against the bill if it doesn't go far enough.

Federal attorney general Christian Porter said he would consult widely with his colleagues and other stakeholders to ensure the bill achieved the 'right' outcomes for Australia before it goes to parliament later in the year.

'That is my sole focus in developing this important legislation,' Mr Porter said.

Last week he held a workshop for Coalition MPs about the bill, with more sessions to follow to explain the legislation to backbenchers. 

A Guardian Essential poll indicated lukewarm support for the religious freedom bill.

Only 38 per cent back the move, and even then only 16 per cent strongly support it. The other 22 per cent said they only supported it somewhat. 

A total of 64 per cent of participants said they thought twice before airing their views in front of someone.

And 58 per cent said employers should not be allowed to determine what their workers say outside of the workplace.  

Pictures: Australian Prime Ministers through history 


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