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Australian white supremacist accused of killing 50 Muslims called far right nationalist Blair Cottrell 'Emperor' three years before mosque massacre - as it is revealed he was living off a $500,000 inheritance

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 23/03/2019 Zoe Zaczek

Self-confessed terrorist Brenton Tarrant referred to far right nationalist Blair Cottrell as 'Emperor' three years before allegedly carrying out a mass-shooting at a Christchurch mosque. 

Tarrant, 28, was charged with one count of murder after allegedly shooting dozens of defenceless worshipers at Friday prayers in two mosques on March 15 - killing 50 and injuring many more. 

An archive of comments uncovered by the ABC's Background Briefing found Tarrant engaged with two Australian far-right groups, United Patriots Front (UPF) and True Blue Crew (TBC). 

Tarrant wrote he would gladly stand behind Mr Cottrell, a symbol of so-called 'white resistance' in Australia and the highest profile leader of Australia's alt right. 

a group of people standing around each other: Australian white supremacist accused of the Christchurch terrorist attack referred to far right nationalist Blair Cottrell (left) as 'Emperor' three years before attack © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Australian white supremacist accused of the Christchurch terrorist attack referred to far right nationalist Blair Cottrell (left) as 'Emperor' three years before attack

While Tarrant's social media accounts have been wiped since the mosque massacre, the archive helps to piece together the alleged terrorist's extremist views. 

The revelation comes as Tarrant reportedly inherited a hefty $500,000 at the age of 19, allowing him to stop working and travel across Europe, the Middle East and Asia. 

Tarrant was 23 when he listed his occupation as 'retired' to a Swedish tour operator, claiming he had enough money to be able to stop work 'perhaps forever or at least for a very long time', The Australian reported.

He inherited the considerable sum of money in 2010 when his father committed suicide after a mesothelioma diagnosis.

In an online investor forum in May 2011, Tarrant suggested he received about half a million dollars while writing under a pseudonym.

'In my p***-ant town, you are the next Bill Gates if you have half a million in liquid assets,' he wrote. 

a person posing for the camera: Brenton Tarrant, 28, has been charged with one count of murder after allegedly shooting 50 defenceless worshipers at Friday prayers in two Christchurch mosques on March 15 © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Brenton Tarrant, 28, has been charged with one count of murder after allegedly shooting 50 defenceless worshipers at Friday prayers in two Christchurch mosques on March 15

'Thus why no one must ever know I'm not a broke personal trainer living with my mother.' 

Tarrant, who allegedly live streamed the Christchurch attack on social media, also released a manifesto where he claimed he was not a member of any group.

The archive, however, reveals Tarrant had an allegiance to a number of Australian far-right figures, mostly notably Mr Cottrell.

Mr Cottrell, who became a public figure for opposing a mosque in Victoria in 2015, is part of a right wing movement defined by its anti-Islamic sentiments.  

Tarrant had engaged with Mr Cottrell's UPF Facebook page as early as April 2016, before it was deleted.

a screenshot of a cell phone: An archive of comments uncovered by the ABC 's Background Briefing found Tarrant engaged with two Australian far-right groups, United Patriots Front (UPF) and True Blue Crew (TBC) © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited An archive of comments uncovered by the ABC 's Background Briefing found Tarrant engaged with two Australian far-right groups, United Patriots Front (UPF) and True Blue Crew (TBC)

Over a 10-month period, Tarrant made more than 30 comments on the two extremist Facebook pages. 

The metadata showed Tarrant responded to Mr Cottrell's critics on social media after UPF members clashed with counter-protesters in Coburg, 2016.  

'Communists will get what communists get, I would love to be there holding one end of the rope when you get yours traitor,' Tarrant wrote.

When Mr Cottrell celebrated Donald Trump's successful election campaign in November 2016 with fellow UPF leader Tom Sewell, Tarrant shared his support. 

The two men live-streamed from Melbourne's Federation Square and Tarrant wrote the event was one of the most important in modern history. 

'Globalists and Marxists on suicide watch, patriots and nationalists triumphant — looking forward to Emperor Blair Cottrell coming soon.' 

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Mr Cottrell (pictured) said he had no relationship with Tarrant and that he didn't know who he is © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Mr Cottrell (pictured) said he had no relationship with Tarrant and that he didn't know who he is

Tarrant also wrote he would gladly stand behind Mr Cottrell, after he appeared on national TV months earlier. 

'Never believed we would have a true leader of the nationalist movement in Australia, and especially not so early in the game,' he wrote about Mr Cottrell.  

Tarrant's last activity seen by the ABC was in February 2017 when he threw support behind Mr Cottrell ahead of his court appearance for staging a fake beheading two years earlier. 

There are no screenshots, but the authenticity of the comments was verified by comparing the archive's preserved metadata against other public posts shared by the groups supporters, the ABC reported. 

The former leaders of UPF posted to their new far-right group Lads Society claiming Tarrant 'did not belong to any group and that he acted alone'.

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Tarrant, who allegedly live streamed the attack, released a manifesto where he claimed he was not a member of any group (pictured: various right wing groups protest) © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Tarrant, who allegedly live streamed the attack, released a manifesto where he claimed he was not a member of any group (pictured: various right wing groups protest)

The group said they spoke with ASIO and State Police services following the Christchurch terrorist attack and they condemned 'politically motivated violence'.

'Politically motivated violence is not in the interest of our organisation or our community,' Lads Society wrote on Facebook.   

'Our mission is to create a community organisation of European descended Australians who identify as such, in order to preserve and grow our culture and legacy on this land.'

Mr Cottrell told the ABC he had no relationship with Tarrant and that he didn't know who he was.  

Tarrant will re-appear in New Zealand's High Court on April 5, when additional charges are expected to be laid. 

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