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Death in paradise: Why the number of Australians dying in Indonesia and Thailand has skyrocketed - while 2,500 have vanished overseas in just one year

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 23/11/2018 Max Margan For Daily Mail Australia
a large passenger jet sitting on top of a runway: More than 7,000 Australian overseas travellers were killed, hospitalised, jailed or had vanished in the past year (stock image) © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited More than 7,000 Australian overseas travellers were killed, hospitalised, jailed or had vanished in the past year (stock image)

Australians seem to be putting themselves more at risk when travelling to south-east Asia with alarming rates of deaths, injuries and arrests.

The number of Australians dying in Indonesia, the Philippines and Thailand - the top three countries for overseas deaths - has skyrocketed.

There were 238 Australians who died in Thailand in 2017-18, up 17 per cent on the previous year, while 153 died in the Philippines (up 21 per cent) and 117 in Indonesia (up nine per cent). 

Callan Jay Everts, 32, from Perth, died of severe head injuries when he crashed his motorbike into the Santo Paulus Church in North Kuta, Indonesia on October 17 this year. 

Lynn Gilmartin et al. posing for the camera: Callan Jay Everts, 32 (left), from Perth, died of severe head injuries when he crashed his motorbike into the Santo Paulus Church in North Kuta on October 17 this year © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Callan Jay Everts, 32 (left), from Perth, died of severe head injuries when he crashed his motorbike into the Santo Paulus Church in North Kuta on October 17 this year

Melbourne's Benjamin Robb, died February 9 in Pattaya, Thailand after at least five men savagely assaulted him in a bar.

Seventy-year-old Reginald Rene Hodgens was reportedly shot in the head at the gate of his rented home in the north-western coastal province of Ilocos Sur in the Phillipines on October 15.

The staggering total of 1,600 Australian travellers have died overseas in the past 12 months, while 2,500 others simply vanished. 

The shocking new statistics were released by the Department of Foreign Affairs on Friday.

According to the report, 1,540 tourists were arrested abroad and 1,585 more were hospitalised.

a group of people standing around a bag of luggage: The figures equate to an Australian dying or being injured overseas every two-and-a-half hours (stock image) © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited The figures equate to an Australian dying or being injured overseas every two-and-a-half hours (stock image)

The figures equate to an Australian dying or being seriously injured overseas every two-and-a-half hours - an increase of 36 per cent over the past five years.

The number of people arrested abroad fell by six per cent on the previous year, but climbed 28 per cent over the past five.

Immigration detention, where Australians are denied entry to a country or breached visa conditions, accounted for 385 of the 1,540 arrests.

a group of people standing around a fire: Australian residents took more than 10.7million overseas trips in the past year (stock image) © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Australian residents took more than 10.7million overseas trips in the past year (stock image)

There was a 72 per cent increase in these cases in Thailand, where the immigration policy was tightened during the year, the Department said.

The United States again accounted for the most arrests and detentions, and Japan for the first time was listed in the top five countries for that category.

The number of Australians being arrested in Japan for drug offences increased by more than 170 per cent.

The Department helped 19 Australians arrested in Japan for drug offences in 2017-18, with the same number of Aussies also finding themselves in handcuffs in China for similar reasons - a 58 per cent increase over the period.

a group of people standing around a bag of luggage: Immigration detention, where Australians are denied entry into a country, accounted for 385 of the 1,540 arrests (stock image) © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Immigration detention, where Australians are denied entry into a country, accounted for 385 of the 1,540 arrests (stock image)

Those detained overseas are regularly checked in on by the Department, who say they managed nearly 400 imprisonment cases worldwide in the past year.

That accounts for a 15 per cent increase over the past five years, with majority of the imprisonment due to fraud and drug cases.

But as Australians are detained more frequently overseas, similarly, more are catching the travel bug than ever before.

Australian residents took more than 10.7million overseas trips in the past year, an increase of 13 per cent over the past five.

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