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Fresh twist in drinking water debacle as police say driver MADE UP controversial fine - but officers WILL prosecute motorists who quench their thirst at the wheel

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 13/10/2019 Tita Smith and Charlie Moore

a person sitting in a car talking on a cell phone: Brock Harris, from Beaudesert, west of the Gold Coast, said he was pulled over as he was approaching his house after working 12 hours in 39C heat (stock image)

Brock Harris, from Beaudesert, west of the Gold Coast, said he was pulled over as he was approaching his house after working 12 hours in 39C heat (stock image)
© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited

Police have confirmed a driver who claimed he was punished for drinking water made up the fine.

But officers have issued a warning to motorists that they could still be prosecuted for quenching their thirst if they are caught being reckless behind the wheel. 

Brock Harris, from Beaudesert, west of the Gold Coast, said he was pulled over as he was approaching his house after working 12 hours in 39C heat.

Mr Harris said he was fined $173 and given one demerit point for not driving with due care and attention.

The story was first reported by the ABC on Thursday - but the Queensland Police have since revealed the fine never happened. 

'We have spoken with the driver and can confirm the claim in the commentary has been unsubstantiated,' a QPS spokesperson said on Friday.

It remains unconfirmed whether he was pulled over at all. 

      

But the police have urged motorists that the fine does exist and will be handed out in instances where consumption of food or drinks interferes with safe driving. 

'There are many people who consume drinks while driving and do it safely in a safe manner,' Queensland Police Superintendent David Johnson told the ABC.

'For us to issue a fine we have to look at the circumstances to see if the driver's actions are causing risks to themselves or others.' 

'Driving without due care and attention was once put before court, but these days it’s a traffic infringement notice that is issued,' he said.

Mr Harris claimed he was pulled over by the police after trying to keep his fluids up on a scorcher of a day in south east Queensland.

'If it is against the law then I'll pay the fine, but it's not compassionate to fine someone on a 39-degree day for trying to stay hydrated,' he previously told the ABC. 

In a response to the saga, which caused public outcry this week, Queensland Police released a statement to remind people that fines help to reinforce safety on our roads.

 'Distractions while driving can have serious consequences and attract significant penalties,' it read.

'Drivers should avoid distractions, including use of their mobile phone or responding to passengers and children in the vehicle where it diverts their attention away from the primary responsibility of ensuring a safe journey on our roads.' 

Driving without due care and attention carries a $533 fine and three demerit points, according to the Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads website.

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