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'I don't trust the government': Karl Stefanovic clashes with Pauline Hanson over the government's new coronavirus tracking app

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 27/04/2020 Lauren Ferri For Daily Mail Australia

Pauline Hanson smiling for the camera: Senator Hanson (pictured) says she refuses to download the app because she does not trust the government with her private information © Provided by Daily Mail Senator Hanson (pictured) says she refuses to download the app because she does not trust the government with her private information One Nation leader Pauline Hanson has snapped at Karl Stefanovic over the new coronavirus tracking app, claiming she does not trust the government.

The federal government's CovidSafe app went live at 6pm Sunday and was downloaded more than 10,000 times in the first hour.

While many Australians are willing to download the application so authorities can track people who may have been in contact with an infected person, it has also sparked privacy and security fears.

Senator Hanson says she refuses to download the app because she does not trust the government with her private information.

'I don't want them tracking me. I don't trust the Government,' she told Today Show host Karl Stefanovic on Monday.

Pictures: The most popular media personalities in Australia (StarsInsider)

She continued to talk about data retention laws brought into place in 2015 and claimed the CovidSafe app could give her information to other companies. 

'Why the hell would I let the Government give it to them personally to download my information?' she asked.

Stefanovic reminded the senator she had a civic duty to the Australian people to help end the virus' stronghold.

'You have a responsibility to the Australian people if we want to try and control this COVID-19 and we want to try to track people,' the morning show host said.  

But Senator Hanson refused to budge and said she knows she does not have the virus nor has she been in contact with anyone who does.

'I have a responsibility to myself first and foremost. I know damn well that I haven't been around people,' she said.

'I've been self-isolating. I haven't got the COVID-19.'

'Besides when you have only a few cases in the blasted country and they lockdown the whole bloody country still and they want to put this app on your phone when we're on very much on the decrease … Come on, Karl. I don't trust them.' 

Pauline Hanson, Karl Stefanovic are posing for a picture: One Nation leader Pauline Hanson has snapped at Karl Stefanovic over the new coronavirus tracking app, claiming she does not trust the government © Provided by Daily Mail One Nation leader Pauline Hanson has snapped at Karl Stefanovic over the new coronavirus tracking app, claiming she does not trust the government

Stefanovic on the other hand is not worried by downloading the app and said anyone who wanted to know his whereabouts would not be entertained.

'They're going to track me – let me tell you where I go. I go to work. I go home. I go to Woolies. I go home. I go to work. I go home … That's my whole life,' he said. 

The CovidSafe app is based on Singapore's TraceTogether software, which records the Bluetooth connections a phone makes with others so the user can give that data to state health authorities if they catch the virus.

a hand holding a cellphone: The Australian Government's new voluntary coronavirus tracing app COVIDSafe is seen on a mobile phone in Melbourne © Provided by Daily Mail The Australian Government's new voluntary coronavirus tracing app COVIDSafe is seen on a mobile phone in Melbourne The government hopes a broader testing regime and the contact tracing app will lead to a relaxation of the economic shutdown sooner. It's expected to be launched on Sunday.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison told ABC radio program, Macca, Australia All Over, that only health authorities would have access to the data. 

'It's another tool we need to get back to normal as much as we can,' he said.

He said the contact numbers picked up by a person's phone are only downloaded by a health officer when someone gets the coronavirus and gives permission.

a person is walking down the street: The Federal Government have made it clear no law-enforcement agencies will have access to your data. Pictured: A woman in a protective face mask is seen walking across Princes Bridge in Melbourne using her mobile phone © Provided by Daily Mail The Federal Government have made it clear no law-enforcement agencies will have access to your data. Pictured: A woman in a protective face mask is seen walking across Princes Bridge in Melbourne using her mobile phone

'No other government agency can use this information, no one in the commonwealth government at all, and in state authorities, only the health officer can use it,' he said.

'Not the police, not the welfare people, nowhere else. Just the health officer.' 

Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton, who recovered from a bout of COVID-19, says it's a more effective approach than trying to remember where someone had been.

a hand holding a cell phone © Provided by Daily Mail 'The beauty of the app is that it can have a handshake, if you like, with people that you've been in close proximity with, to find the phone,' he told Sky Sunday Agenda.

He said the privacy issues had been dealt with.

'There are absolute protections that are guaranteed around the privacy,' he said.

'All of us have numerous apps on our phones which collect more data than we have here.'

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