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'If you start seeing wounds such as these please get somewhere fast!' Mom issues warning after her son contracts a flesh-eating bacteria swimming off a Maryland beach

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 4/07/2019 Valerie Edwards

Warning: Images in the article may be distressing for some readers.

A young boy was rushed to the hospital after he contracted a flesh-eating bacteria at a Maryland beach. 

Carey said in a Facebook post on Saturday that her son contracted the flesh-eating bacteria while he was swimming at a bay off the coast of Ocean City on June 23 © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Carey said in a Facebook post on Saturday that her son contracted the flesh-eating bacteria while he was swimming at a bay off the coast of Ocean City on June 23 Brittany Carey shared two graphic images of her son's leg where the bacteria began eating away at his flesh in three spots. 

Carey said in a Facebook post on Saturday that her parents had taken her son out for a beach day off the coast of Ocean City on June 23. 

She wrote that her son had a great time swimming until June 24 when she 'started noticing little spots developing all over his body'.

'Tuesday morning there were open wounds developing but I had thought he was scratching them, making them worse. Only to find when I picked him up Tuesday they were a lot bigger and a lot more,' she added. 

Carey said she took her son to Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Maryland, where doctors told her that he had a common ocean bacteria called Vibrio.

The bacteria can also be found in raw, contaminated seafood. 

Carey said she shared the Facebook post as a warning for other parents. 

'Please be careful out there guys and if you start seeing wounds such as these please get somewhere fast!'

As of Monday, Carey said her son's pediatrician 'is really happy with the healing'.

Within the past few months, there have been dozens of people to contract the flesh-eating bacteria as climate change fuels the spread of the feared bugs in once-safe oceans, a new study suggested in June. 

Five people in Delaware and New Jersey contracted flesh-eating infections in the last two years from seafood or water from the Delaware Bay, which used to be too cold for the microorganisms. 

But as water temperatures rise, beaches along the Northeast Coast may become comfortable homes for the bacteria Vibrio vulnificus - and more more dangerous ones for humans. 

The researchers from the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia and Cooper University Hospital warn that many beaches may soon be unsafe for people with weakened immune systems or open wounds. 

A number of kinds of bacteria can become necrotizing, or 'flesh-eating.' 

The most common water-borne one is Vibrio vulnificus, a bacteria species that lives in brackish (mixed fresh and salt) water and prefers a warm climate. 

Typically, these bacteria need water to have a surface temperature above 13 C (55.4 F) to thrive, and infections are most common in the waters surrounding states like Texas, Florida, Louisiana and Florida. 

Carey said she took her son to Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Maryland, where doctors told her that he had a common ocean bacteria called Vibrio. Her son contracted the bacteria from a beach in Ocean City (file image). He is now healing well, Carey said © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Carey said she took her son to Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Maryland, where doctors told her that he had a common ocean bacteria called Vibrio. Her son contracted the bacteria from a beach in Ocean City (file image). He is now healing well, Carey said

Currently, the water temperatures of the entire Delaware Bay is well over 60 degrees. 

Last week, 12-year-old Kylei Brown, of Indiana was diagnosed with flesh-eating bacteria after going for a swim at a beach in Florida. 

Just days later 77-year-old Lynn Fleming was infected by a bacteria after she fell and scraped her leg while walking on a Florida beach. 

She was taken to a hospital the next day where she was diagnosed with the flesh-eating disease and died Thursday after suffering two strokes and organ failure.   

In Virginia, officials from the state's Department of Health said as of June 1, there have been four confirmed cases of Vibrio.  

Officials expect those numbers to grow throughout the summer. 

In 2016, there 41 confirmed cases of vibrio, but that number more than doubled to 87 last year. 

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