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Pauline Hanson is in trouble and may LOSE her Senate seat

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 21/05/2022 Tess Ikonomou For Australian Associated Press

Voters have turned their backs on One Nation founder Pauline Hanson, who could lose her Senate spot. 

The conservative politician's party is trailing behind the Queensland Greens candidate Penny Allman-Payne in the race for the Senate. 

Senator Hanson, who had to spend election day in isolation after testing positive to COVID-19, was well short of a quota on Saturday night as counting continued. 

Her party polled 7.8 per cent of the Senate vote, to the Greens' 14 per cent.

Voters have seemingly turned their backs on One Nation founder Pauline Hanson - who could lose her Senate seat as a result of Saturday's poll © Provided by Daily Mail Voters have seemingly turned their backs on One Nation founder Pauline Hanson - who could lose her Senate seat as a result of Saturday's poll The conservative politician's party is trailing behind the Queensland Greens candidate Penny Allman-Payne (above) for the race to the Senate © Provided by Daily Mail The conservative politician's party is trailing behind the Queensland Greens candidate Penny Allman-Payne (above) for the race to the Senate

The outspoken Queenslander has run an anti-vaccine mandate campaign, and refused a coronavirus jab herself. 

Senator Hanson was first elected to the Senate for Queensland in 2016. 

In the Sunshine State, Nationals senator Matt Canavan was re-elected, as was his Victorian colleague Bridget McKenzie. 


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High-profile Liberal senator Simon Birmingham was also returned. 

On the incoming Labor government's side Penny Wong, soon to be foreign minister, was re-elected for South Australia. 

Senator Wong will need to be sworn in next week ahead of the Quad security meeting in Tokyo on Tuesday. 

 Anthony Albanese (pictured with Penny Wong, girlfriend Jodie and son Nathan) has declared 'Aussies have voted for change' after securing a historic election win © Provided by Daily Mail  Anthony Albanese (pictured with Penny Wong, girlfriend Jodie and son Nathan) has declared 'Aussies have voted for change' after securing a historic election win

Labor senator Murray Watt was also returned to the chamber, while Queensland senator and former assistant minister for women Amanda Stoker is at risk of losing her position. 

Senator Stoker, who was third on the Queensland LNP ticket, sparked controversy after attending an anti-abortion rally in Brisbane during the election campaign. 

High-profile candidates Nick Xenophon and Clive Palmer fell well short of a quota in their SA and Queensland races. 

Independent candidate and former Wallaby David Pocock is tipped to defeat outgoing minister Zed Seselja on preferences for an ACT Senate seat. 

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The Greens are declaring a 'Greens-slide' in the lower house as the party remains on track for a historic electoral win.

The minor party is set to gain two seats in Queensland, including Liberal-held Ryan and Labor-held Griffith, based on ABC projections on Saturday night. Postal and pre-poll votes are still to be counted.

The seats of Brisbane, Macnamara in Victoria and Richmond in NSW remained unresolved, but early counts showed a lean towards the Greens from the major parties.

Greens leader Adam Bandt declared the election a 'Greens-slide' on Twitter.

'People have backed us in record numbers and delivered a massive mandate for action on climate and inequality,' he said.

Mr Bandt won the first lower house seat for the minor party in 2010 representing Melbourne.

A parliamentary balance of power held by the Greens would preference stable, effective and progressive government, he said.

Former Labor leader Bill Shorten said affluent people voted Greens because they don't have to worry about their finances.

'Part of the challenge for Labor in the inner-city seats, and I have to contend with the Greens in my seat too, is very affluent people tend to vote Green because they don't have a worry in the world,' he told the Nine Network.

Former Liberal foreign minister Julie Bishop agreed and called it a 'luxury' to vote for the Greens.

But Mr Bandt said voters told him they were supporting the party for the first time this election not only because of climate action but because they didn't see many key policy differences between Labor and the coalition.

He credited a people-powered campaign in Queensland for the Greens' success.

'We didn't go small target. We were very clear that there is a better and fairer way and that is a big part of the reason why we are seeing the results,' he told ABC News.

If the Greens do hold the balance of power on the crossbench, they would approach the parliament with an open mind, Mr Bandt pledged.

'It's stable and effective and progressive government that would be our priority, with action on climate and action on inequality,' he said.

The Greens held the balance of power along with independents on the crossbench following a hung parliament at the 2010 election.

 
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