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Inside the corona green zones: The suburbs that are beating the killer virus and haven't seen a single case - and the 13 areas you NEED to avoid… so is your neighbourhood safe?

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 11/04/2020 Alisha Rouse For Daily Mail Australia

Video provided by Nine News

Huge swathes of Australia are still free from the deadly coronavirus, with not one single confirmed case, despite it infecting 6,283 people across the country. 

There are numerous safe havens, particularly in the north-western corner of New South Wales, tropical northern Queensland and the coast of Western Australia.

But several areas are still struggling with outbreaks of the deadly respiratory disease, which is forming in clusters in major cities - including Sydney and the Central Coast.

The situation is so deadly in densely-populated areas of NSW that it prompted officials in Queensland to issue warnings for people to avoid travelling to the state.

But Easter sun-seekers have been urged not to travel this long weekend, particularly not to so-called green zones - as they could unknowingly bring the virus into the community. 

Here, we look at the five mainland states, is your town safe? 

a man standing in front of a car: Police are seen questioning drivers along the New South Wales and Queensland border on Saturday (pictured) with officials fearing travel may lead to a COVID-19 spike

Police are seen questioning drivers along the New South Wales and Queensland border on Saturday (pictured) with officials fearing travel may lead to a COVID-19 spike
© Provided by Daily Mail

WHERE'S SAFE, AND WHERE TO AVOID

NSW green zones

- Central Darling

- Snowy Valleys 

- Wentworth 

- Murray River

-  Moree Plains

- Bogan 

NSW red zones 

- Sydney

- Central Coast

- Northern Beaches

- Randwick

- Sutherland Shire

- Woollahra

- Waverley

- Inner West 

NEW SOUTH WALES 

From Saturday, people in Queensland are even required to self-isolate for 14 days if they travel to one of NSW's 13 'cornavirus hotspots'.

This includes Blacktown, Canterybury-Bankstown, Central Coast, Cumberland, Inner West, Ku-ring-gai, Northern Beaches, Randwick, Ryde and Sutherland Shire.

It also included Sydney itself, as well as Waverley and Woollahra, which includes world-famous beaches such as Bondi and Bronte. 

Sydney CBD has 149 confirmed cases, with 170 in Waverley and 145 in the Northern Beaches. 

There are currently 2,822 cases of COVID-19 in NSW, accounting for more than a third of the national total.

But small towns in the Central Darling area, in the state's north-western corner, are completely free of the virus.

Pictures: Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak around the world

This includes Narrabri, Cobar, Brewarrina and Ivanhoe, as well as towns in the state's southwest, such as Coolamon.

Temperatures over the weekend are set to reach 25C in Sydney, with sunshine and blue skies, leading authorities to fear even more people will defy the restrictions.

They are designed to stop the spread of the deadly coronavirus, which has killed more than 94,000 people worldwide. 

a group of people walking on a beach holding a surf board: Burleigh Heads on the Gold Coast was packed with surfers and swimmers on Friday (pictured) despite being a coronavirus hotspot

Burleigh Heads on the Gold Coast was packed with surfers and swimmers on Friday (pictured) despite being a coronavirus hotspot
© Provided by Daily Mail

GREEN AND RED ZONES IN QUEENSLAND 

QLD green zones:

- Torres and Cape

- South West

- Central West

- North West 

QLD red zones:

- Gold Coast

- Brisbane

- Metro North

- Metro South

- Sunshine Coast 

QUEENSLAND 

Health Minister Steven Miles urged Queenslanders not to travel this Easter long weekend, but if they must do so, not to go to so-called COVID-19 hotspots.

'I would urge you to check the areas but more importantly, I would urge you not to travel in the first place,' he said.

Northern areas of the state have been mostly protected from the respiratory infection, which was of particular importance to the government because of the vulnerable indigenous communities.

The Torres Strait Islands and the Cape have no reported cases.  

The north-west of the state, including towns such as Mt Isa and Carpentaria also have no cases, neither does the central-west or south-western districts.

This includes Boulia, Nockatunga and Barcaldine.  

But the same can't be said for areas close to the border with NSW, with the usnshine Coast and Gold Coast badly affected.  

Brisbane has 223 confirmed cases in its southern suburbs, and 288 in northern areas of the city. 

a group of people sitting on a bench: A group of friends are seen enjoying lunch together despite social distancing rules in Brisbane on March 24 (pictured), one of the worst areas in Queensland for COVID-19 cases

A group of friends are seen enjoying lunch together despite social distancing rules in Brisbane on March 24 (pictured), one of the worst areas in Queensland for COVID-19 cases
© Provided by Daily Mail

WA'S SAFEST AND WORST HIT AREAS 

WA green zones:

Most other areas of the state outside of Perth and Broome are free from COVID-19

This includes popular south coast holiday towns such as Esperance

WA red zones:

- Wanneroo, Perth 

- Joondalup, Perth

- Stirling, Perth

- Melville, Perth 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Western Australia has been largely spared from the outbreak, with 76 local government areas reporting no coronavirus cases at all.

The state's premier Mark McGowan put it into an unprecedented lockdown, meaning not only is WA cut off from the rest of Australia - but travel is not even allowed between its nine regions.  

It means popular holiday areas such as Esperance and Monkey Mia are likely to remain coronavirus free as holidaymakers from cities such as Perth have not been allowed to travel there.  

The state has 506 confirmed coronavirus cases in total, including many who have left cruise ships in Perth and Fremantle.

As of Friday, 17 people remain in intensive care in the state. 

But despite temperatures set to hit 37C on Saturday, the beaches have not yet been closed.

Health Minister Roger Cook said: 'The reports we have from the police are that people in general terms are observing the regulations and if that's the case we can keep the beaches open, and that's what we want.

'We don't want to have to close the beaches down.' 

a group of people walking on a beach: Two police officers patrol along Cottesloe Beach in Perth on April 10 (pictured). While the beach remains open police are monitoring social distancing rule breakers gathering in groups © Provided by Daily Mail Two police officers patrol along Cottesloe Beach in Perth on April 10 (pictured). While the beach remains open police are monitoring social distancing rule breakers gathering in groups a group of people on a beach: Crowds are seen walking along St Kilda's boardwalk in Melbourne on Friday (pictured) despite the area having multiple confirmed COVID-19 cases © Provided by Daily Mail Crowds are seen walking along St Kilda's boardwalk in Melbourne on Friday (pictured) despite the area having multiple confirmed COVID-19 cases

WHERE IS SAFE AND MOST DANGEROUS IN VICTORIA 

VIC green zones:   

- The south coast, including Apollo Bay and Colac

- the Alpine region

- Buloke

- Colac Otway

- Glenelg

- Hindmarsh

- South Gippsland

- Queenscliffe 

 VIC red zones:  

- Stonnington

- Banyule

- Port Phillip 

- Mornington Peninsula

- Greater Geelong 

 VICTORIA

The state has been affected relatively badly by coronavirus, with only eight council areas reporting no cases.

This includes the southern coastal towns such as Apollo Bay and Colac, which are south-west of Melbourne.

Other unaffected areas are the state's Alpine region, and towns along the border with Southern Australia.  

Stonnington, in Melbourne's centre, has the highest number of cases at 87, with Banyule, in the city's north-eastern suburbs, has 75.

Port Phillip, including the popular St Kilda beach, has also been badly affected.

The city's beaches, including St Kilda and Brighton Beach, were closed down by officials several weeks ago - as people continued to flock to the sand. 

South Gippsland is also unaffected, as is Hindmarsh, Buloke, Queenscliffe and Towong. 

Under strict social distancing rules, only local residents are allowed to surf this weekend - meaning people cannot travel around the state to beaches outside of their own area. 

Health officials hope it will stop holidaymakers taking advantage of the good weather, travelling around and unwittingly spreading the virus. 

The north-eastern historical town of Beechworth in Victoria (pictured on Thursday) has not reported a single COVID-19 case © Provided by Daily Mail The north-eastern historical town of Beechworth in Victoria (pictured on Thursday) has not reported a single COVID-19 case a group of people on a beach: Victoria's stunning Apollo Bay (pictured) has reported not a single case of COVID-19, making it one of the safest places to live © Provided by Daily Mail Victoria's stunning Apollo Bay (pictured) has reported not a single case of COVID-19, making it one of the safest places to live

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

The state is reporting incredibly low daily infection rates, with just seven new confirmed cases on Friday.

It now has 428 cases - aged between their 20s and 80s - but 179 of them are recovered. 

SA GREEN AND RED ZONES 

SA green zones:

- Flinders Range

- Tumby Bay

- Franklin Harbour

- Mount Remarkable

SA red zones: 

- Barossa Valley

- Adelaide airport 

- Cruise ships 

Of those patients, 15 remain in hospital in Adelaide, six in intensive care and four in critical conditions. 

With 77 per cent of its population living in Adelaide, many areas outside the capital are COVID-19 free.

Towns in the Flinders Range and Tumby Bay have no cases, with the same going for Franklin Harbour and Mount Remarkable. 

But many cases have sprung up thanks to a coronavirus cluster in the Barossa Valley, after an infected American tour group visited a vineyard there in March. 

There are 39 confirmed cases linked to areas within the Barossa region including Tanunda, Nuriootpa, Williamstown, Angaston and Lyndoch.

Anyone in these areas from March 14 who develops symptoms should immediately self-isolate and be tested, health authorities in the state said.

Similarly, there has been a cluster of 33 cases identified at Adelaide Airport.  

a building that has a sign on the side of a road: Hawyer, in Flinders Range in South Australia (pictured) also has no reported coronavirus cases, compared to more dangerous areas close to cities © Provided by Daily Mail Hawyer, in Flinders Range in South Australia (pictured) also has no reported coronavirus cases, compared to more dangerous areas close to cities a black sign with white text: As of Saturday morning, 56 have died in Australia from coronavirus, with 6,283 confirmed cases across the country © Provided by Daily Mail As of Saturday morning, 56 have died in Australia from coronavirus, with 6,283 confirmed cases across the country

The federal health minister has warned Australians it is vital to follow social distancing restrictions over the Easter weekend.

'This, in many ways, is the most important weekend we may face in the whole course of the virus,' Greg Hunt said on Thursday.

The country has seen the rate of coronavirus infections drop in recent days to the point where we have seen less than 100 new cases in 24 for the first time in three weeks.

a body of water: A surfer makes his way to the water at Bells Beach in Torquay on Friday (pictured) with only local residents are allowed to surf this weekend as Victoria's stage three social distancing laws started with a ban on all but the most basic outdoor activities © Provided by Daily Mail A surfer makes his way to the water at Bells Beach in Torquay on Friday (pictured) with only local residents are allowed to surf this weekend as Victoria's stage three social distancing laws started with a ban on all but the most basic outdoor activities

However, in an effort to prevent a resurgence in infections, state authorities will be out in force cracking down social distancing rule breakers during the four-day religious holiday.

'As we go into Easter with welcome news for Australia, the virus does not take a holiday, therefore none of us can relax what we do,' Mr Hunt said.

'If we can lock in the gains that we've made as a nation through the courage and sacrifice of those on the health, medical and policing frontlines, but also through the immense goodwill and discipline of Australians, then we can help really protect Australian lives going forward and give ourselves the pathway through.'

Despite the warnings, beachgoers flocked to the sand on Good Friday and on Saturday morning.   

Queensland Police were forced to step in and move off the beach at Burleigh Heads on the Gold Coast after large crowds of surfers, swimmers and sunbathers flocked there on Friday morning. 

a man riding on the back of a white fence: The situation is so bad in Sydney's eastern beaches, that on Friday workers were forced to tape off walking paths to ensure people don't gather there (pictured along the Bondi to Bronte walk) © Provided by Daily Mail The situation is so bad in Sydney's eastern beaches, that on Friday workers were forced to tape off walking paths to ensure people don't gather there (pictured along the Bondi to Bronte walk) a man riding a skateboard up the side of a fence: A man on a skateboard is seen going past the closed off Surfers Paradise beach on the Gold Coast on Friday (pictured) © Provided by Daily Mail A man on a skateboard is seen going past the closed off Surfers Paradise beach on the Gold Coast on Friday (pictured)

Burleigh Heads was closed along with all other Gold Coast beaches on Wednesday, ahead of the Easter Long Weekend. 

Surfing, dog walking and running along the beach front are permitted as long as social distancing protocols are followed.

The fine for ignoring social distancing rules in Queensland is $1,334.50 per person.

 The boardwalk along Miami Beach on the Gold Coast was also packed with families walking and biking in close proximity to each other.

Hundreds of beachgoers were also seen flouting social distancing rules in Perth as temperatures crept up to a scorching 36C.

Leighton Beach was packed with holidaymakers who came prepared for a day of sun, bringing with them umbrellas, tents and towels.

In Sydney, the famous Bondi Beach has been covered in metal barriers to ward off potential rule breakers over the long weekend. 

Fearing thousands will descend on the area this weekend and try to access the closed beaches, the Bondi to Bronte walk is now covered in red tape and barriers.

But that didn't stop a thoughtless swimmer defying strict coronavirus lockdown laws, risking a $1,000 fine, he crept behind Bondi Beach's closed barriers to take a morning dip.

He was seen darting behind gates which read 'beach closed' to enjoy a swim in the sea all by himself.

Even coming armed with a towel, he then dried off before putting his running gear back on, all without being detected by police. 

Holidaymakers were also seen flocking to hotspots in New Zealand, despite the strict four-week lockdown, which prevents people from leaving their homes for anything other than essential reasons. 

Police were stopping motorists on their way to the Coromandel, on New Zealand's North Island on Friday. 

A number of cars had to turn back, missing out on a weekend of sun and sea.

There are checkpoints across the country to ensure people on the roads are travelling for essential purposes only. 

a person standing on top of a sandy beach: Australians were seen embracing the Good Friday public holiday at beaches, including this couple at Scarborough Beach in Perth on Friday (pictured) © Provided by Daily Mail Australians were seen embracing the Good Friday public holiday at beaches, including this couple at Scarborough Beach in Perth on Friday (pictured) a group of people on a beach: Dog walkers were seen lining beaches in Perth at Mosman Beach while groups of swimmers took to the sea on Friday (pictured) © Provided by Daily Mail Dog walkers were seen lining beaches in Perth at Mosman Beach while groups of swimmers took to the sea on Friday (pictured)

It comes as officials announced Australia 'is on the cusp' of defeating the deadly coronavirus, saying it's possible for the virus to 'die out' in a matter of weeks.

Deputy chief medical officer Paul Kelly said Australia's rates of transmission were down to one or two people for every infected person.

'Where you want to be is below one – so less than one other person being infected after a person themselves has the infection,' he said. 

'Once you get to that point the virus dies out or the epidemic dies out.

'At the moment we're probably on the cusp of that in Australia … whether that's where we're going to be in several weeks or months remains to be seen.' 

Mr Kelly has urged vigilance, saying relaxing strict lockdown restrictions could see an explosion of cases. 

Without social distancing measures that are currently in place, one positive person could lead to 400 other cases within a month, he said.

a circuit board © Provided by Daily Mail

 

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