You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Blacktip reef sharks swim through bay in Thailand as COVID-19 closes surrounding beaches

Dozens of rare blacktip reef sharks are continuing to return to beaches in Thailand deserted amid the spread of the coronavirus. The herd was spotted by a national park staff who was patrolling along the currently closed Maya bay in Krabi, southern Thailand on Tuesday (April 21) morning. Footage shows the marine creatures enjoying swimming in the undisturbed shallow water of Maya Bay, one of the most popular beaches in Southeast Asia. Maya Bay has been closed since June 2018 to rejuvenate the ecosystem and officials have not yet announced the reopening date. Sharks were already returning to the popular bay but more have been seen since the surrounding beaches in Krabi have been devoid of any human activity because of restrictions on tourism caused by the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic. Earlier this week, a family of 22 dugongs was seen around the Koh Libong islands in Trang province in the south of the country on Wednesday morning (April 22). The school, including mothers and babies, were feeding freely on seagrass without the usual disturbance from fishing boats and speedboats carrying tourists. All tourism in Thailand has been halted because of the Covid-19 pandemic, with curfews, travel bans in place between regions, and inbound passenger flights canceled. Marine scientist Thon Thamrongnawasawat said: ''It’s quite unusual. This species of mammal is very sensitive to speed boats and people. When they are gone, they feel free to gather in a large group and come close to shore.'' Dozens of rare blacktip reef sharks are continuing to return to beaches in Thailand deserted amid the spread of the coronavirus. The herd was spotted by a national park staff who was patrolling along the currently closed Maya bay in Krabi, southern Thailand on Tuesday (April 21) morning. Footage shows the marine creatures enjoying swimming in the undisturbed shallow water of Maya Bay, one of the most popular beaches in Southeast Asia. Maya Bay has been closed since June 2018 to rejuvenate the ecosystem and officials have not yet announced the reopening date. Sharks were already returning to the popular bay but more have been seen since the surrounding beaches in Krabi have been devoid of any human activity because of restrictions on tourism caused by the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic. Earlier this week, a family of 22 dugongs was seen around the Koh Libong islands in Trang province in the south of the country on Wednesday morning (April 22). The school, including mothers and babies, were feeding freely on seagrass without the usual disturbance from fishing boats and speedboats carrying tourists. All tourism in Thailand has been halted because of the Covid-19 pandemic, with curfews, travel bans in place between regions, and inbound passenger flights canceled. Marine scientist Thon Thamrongnawasawat said: ''It’s quite unusual. This species of mammal is very sensitive to speed boats and people. When they are gone, they feel free to gather in a large group and come close to shore.''

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon