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Wonderwall Logo By Wonderwall.com Editors of Wonderwall | Slide 2 of 10: If Dolly Parton has yet to comment on a recent Change.org push to "replace all Confederate statues in Tennessee" with her likeness, it could be because she's busy promoting a forthcoming "visual memoir and annotated songbook," "Dolly Parton, Songteller: My Life in Lyrics." Chronicle Books announced the release, due out in November, this week, calling it an exploration of "the personal stories behind the lyrics" of 175 of the singer's favorite original songs, according to SoundsLikeNashville. The book aims to show "the personal stories behind the lyrics — in her own words — along with never-before-seen photographs and memorabilia," the outlet reports. "A songteller is what I am, and this is my first-ever book of lyrics," Parton explains. "So, I've revisited my memories and opened up my archives to share the stories and treasures behind them in a way I never have before." Speaking of "treasures," that's just what fans including Henry Winkler have been calling Parton on social media in posts linking to the Change.org petition, which comes on the heels of calls from Taylor Swift, Reese Witherspoon and more celebs to ditch Tennessee's many Confederate icons. The keyword there might be "many," though. While Parton's historic (and ongoing) music career, along with her decades-spanning philanthropic projects, make her a great choice for a statue anywhere, some, including the New York Times, have pointed out she's long refused to share her political positions. Others, according to EW, have suggested on Twitter that Confederate statues should be replaced with black leaders, rather than white country singers.

Dolly Parton announces new book about her life amid calls to replace Confederate statues with her likeness

If Dolly Parton has yet to comment on a recent Change.org push to "replace all Confederate statues in Tennessee" with her likeness, it could be because she's busy promoting a forthcoming "visual memoir and annotated songbook," "Dolly Parton, Songteller: My Life in Lyrics." Chronicle Books announced the release, due out in November, this week, calling it an exploration of "the personal stories behind the lyrics" of 175 of the singer's favorite original songs, according to SoundsLikeNashville. The book aims to show "the personal stories behind the lyrics — in her own words — along with never-before-seen photographs and memorabilia," the outlet reports. "A songteller is what I am, and this is my first-ever book of lyrics," Parton explains. "So, I've revisited my memories and opened up my archives to share the stories and treasures behind them in a way I never have before." Speaking of "treasures," that's just what fans including Henry Winkler have been calling Parton on social media in posts linking to the Change.org petition, which comes on the heels of calls from Taylor Swift, Reese Witherspoon and more celebs to ditch Tennessee's many Confederate icons. The keyword there might be "many," though. While Parton's historic (and ongoing) music career, along with her decades-spanning philanthropic projects, make her a great choice for a statue anywhere, some, including the New York Times, have pointed out she's long refused to share her political positions. Others, according to EW, have suggested on Twitter that Confederate statues should be replaced with black leaders, rather than white country singers.

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