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14 Organic Foods Nutritionists Don’t Waste Their Money On

Reader's Digest Canada Logo By Charlotte Hilton Andersen of Reader's Digest Canada | Slide 1 of 15: From apples to ice pops, fruit snacks to popcorn, organic items are filling store shelves these days and are one of the fastest growing sectors in the food market. As more and more people become concerned about the planet and their waistlines, it makes sense that they're looking for better options to eat. But does organic always mean better?
The first thing you need to know is that 'organic' is a description of how food is produced, not necessarily how healthy it is, says Amanda A. Kostro Miller, a registered dietitian, and advisor for Smart Healthy Living. The biggest factor in the organic label is whether or not certain pesticides and chemicals were used during the farming or harvesting process. So if you're concerned about toxins in your food, it makes sense to buy organic—at least in some cases.
What's more, organic meat and dairy have 50 percent more healthy fats, according to a study published in the medical journal The BMJ. And organic produce has more antioxidants than conventional varieties, according to a separate study. But the nutrition varies greatly between foods and while it's worth it to buy organic for foods on the Environmental Working Group's 'Dirty Dozen' list, there are plenty of foods where conventional is just as good as organic, Kostro Miller says.

From apples to ice pops, fruit snacks to popcorn, organic items are filling store shelves these days and are one of the fastest growing sectors in the food market. As more and more people become concerned about the planet and their waistlines, it makes sense that they're looking for better options to eat. But does organic always mean better? The first thing you need to know is that 'organic' is a description of how food is produced, not necessarily how healthy it is, says Amanda A. Kostro Miller, a registered dietitian, and advisor for Smart Healthy Living. The biggest factor in the organic label is whether or not certain pesticides and chemicals were used during the farming or harvesting process. So if you're concerned about toxins in your food, it makes sense to buy organic—at least in some cases. What's more, organic meat and dairy have 50 percent more healthy fats, according to a study published in the medical journal The BMJ. And organic produce has more antioxidants than conventional varieties, according to a separate study. But the nutrition varies greatly between foods and while it's worth it to buy organic for foods on the Environmental Working Group's 'Dirty Dozen' list, there are plenty of foods where conventional is just as good as organic, Kostro Miller says.
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