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Narrow, 4-storey $3M Riverdale house stalls on market

cbc.ca logo cbc.ca 2018-12-28 CBC/Radio-Canada
a large building: Back in 2016, the house made headlines for a dispute where the home’s owner wanted a neighbour to trim limbs of a tree that got in the way during construction. © CBC Back in 2016, the house made headlines for a dispute where the home’s owner wanted a neighbour to trim limbs of a tree that got in the way during construction.

A house in Toronto's east end that first ruffled feathers with its one-of-a-kind design has caught attention once again — this time for its sky-high price tag.

The narrow four-storey Riverdale house has been billed as functionally minimalist "with exclusive finishes," and now it can be yours for a cool $3 million. 

Located well away from the sidewalk on Hamilton Street, near Dundas Street E. and Broadview Avenue, the house is nestled between two others — but critics say it looks out of place.

"I don't know how they got a permit," Cathy Sawada said. "I think it's ugly. It's got no charm, and it's way too small to be worth $3 million. What are they thinking?"

a car parked in front of a house: Mark Bochsler/CBC © Mark Bochsler/CBC Mark Bochsler/CBC

Despite the house's small footprint, the steep price means it isn't for those searching for the neighbourhood's best value.

"Anything [on this block] is going to go north of a million dollars but not $3 million. A renovated home, maybe a million and a half, maybe a little bit more, but now you're more than double that cost," real estate agent Andrew Ipekian told CBC Toronto.

House contentious among neighbours

The house has proved to be contentious well before it was even completed.

Back in 2016, it made headlines for a dispute where the home's owner, Cyril Borovsky, wanted a neighbour to trim limbs of a tree that got in the way during construction.

a large building: Mark Bochsler/CBC © Mark Bochsler/CBC Mark Bochsler/CBC

It was a move some arborists said could have killed the tree, but Borovsky said "the best arborists in Canada" told him the tree not only would survive the pruning, but also need it.

When it was finally completed, the house wasn't warmly received by the neighbourhood.

"[It] had the community really upset, the really tallness of it and the fact that it's set so far back and didn't match anything else on the street," Coun. Paula Fletcher said.

Market reaction tepid

CBC Toronto reached out to the owner to ask about the design and price, but hasn't heard back yet.

However, reaction to the house on the market has been tepid so far.

The listing has been available for more than 100 days, and in the city's hot real estate market, experts say that's usually a sign the price needs to be lowered.

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