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Biden makes new commitments at Tribal Nations Summit

SHOTLIST:RESTRICTION SUMMARY:US NETWORK POOLWashington, DC - 30 November 20221. President Joe Biden walks into Tribal Nations Summit2. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Biden, U.S. President:"I made a commitment my administration would prioritize and respect nation to nation relationships, and I'm going to make sure that happens."3. Cutaway of audience4. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Biden, U.S. President:"And as all of you know, there are tribal communities at risk of being washed away, washed away by superstorms, rising sea levels and wildfires raging. I've flown over several thousand acres of the storms and the fires in the west in particular, and also down in the southwest. And it's devastating. That's why today I'm announcing $135 million commitment to help 11 tribal communities from Maine, Louisiana, Arizona, Washington State and Alaska to move, in some cases, their entire communities back to safer ground and pay for that. I've also requested $9.1 billion, that's with a B, billion dollars from the Indian Health Services. I've asked Congress for the first time ever to make that funding mandatory (applause)."5. Cutaway of audience6. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Biden, U.S. President:"My administration listened. We heard you. And we're implementing many of the changes you asked for. Today I signed a new presidential memorandum that improves consultation between the federal government and tribal nations based on key principles. Consultation has to be a two way, nation to nation exchange (applause)."7. Cutaway of audience8. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Biden, U.S. President:"I tell you what, no one's ever done as much as president as this administration. Period. I am committed."STORYLINE:President Joe Biden made a series of new commitments to Native American nations Wednesday during the government's first in-person summit on tribal affairs in six years.Speaking on the opening day of the Tribal Nations Summit in Washington, Biden said he made a commitment that his administration "would prioritize and respect nation to nation relationships." And he declared he's upholding that commitment by "ushering in a new era and advancing a way for the federal government to work with tribal nations."The changes Biden announced include uniform standards for federal agencies to consult with tribes, a plan to revitalize Native languages and new efforts to strengthen the tribal rights that are outlined in existing treaties with the U.S. government. The president also announced a $135 million commitment to help 11 tribal communities impacted by climate change and rising sea levels to move their costal buildings and structures to safer higher ground.And he said he's requested $9 billion from Congress for the first time ever to provide mandatory funding for the Indian Health Services."My administration listened. We heard you. And we're implementing many of the changes you asked for," Biden told the summit.The gathering coincides with National Native American Heritage Month, which is celebrated in November. Leaders and representatives from hundreds of Native American tribes are expected to attend. The Biden administration said its goal is to build on previous progress and create opportunities for lasting change in Indian Country. However, the lasting nature of Biden's commitments isn't guaranteed without codified laws and regulations.Federal agencies recently have been creating tribal advisory councils and reimagining consultation policies that go beyond a "check the box" exercise. Some of the more significant changes involve incorporating Indigenous knowledge and practices into decision-making and federal research."Today I signed a new presidential memorandum that improves consultation between the federal government and tribal nations based on key principles. Consultation has to be a two way, nation to nation exchange," Biden said.The tribal nations summit wasn't held during then-President Donald Trump's administration. The Biden administration held one virtually last year as the coronavirus pandemic ravaged the U.S. and highlighted deepening and long-standing inequities in tribal communities. Both administrations signed off on legislation that infused much-needed funding into Indian Country to help address health care, lost revenue, housing, internet access and other needs. The 574 federally recognized tribes in the U.S. received a combined $20 billion in American Rescue Plan Act funding under the Biden administration.===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory.
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