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Florida Gulf Coast island faces massive cleanup

SHOTLIST:RESTRICTION SUMMARY: ASSOCIATED PRESSSanibel, Florida – 30 September 2022HEADLINE: Florida is faced with destruction in aftermath1. Aerial shots of hurricane destructionANNOTATION: The devastating storm surge destroyed many older homes on the barrier island of Sanibel, Florida, and gouged crevices into its sand dunes.ANNOTATION: Taller condominium buildings were intact but with the bottom floor blown out. Trees and utility poles were strewn everywhere.ANNOTATION: The powerful storm, estimated to be one of the costliest hurricanes ever to hit the U.S., has terrorized people for much of the week.2. Shot of Sanibel residents getting off fire department boatANNOTATION: The Coast Guard used boats and helicopters Friday to evacuate residents who stayed for the storm and then were cut off from the mainland.STORYLINE:A revived Hurricane Ian pounded coastal South Carolina on Friday, ripping apart piers and flooding streets after the ferocious storm caused catastrophic damage in Florida, trapping thousands in their homes and leaving at least 17 people dead.The powerful storm, estimated to be one of the costliest hurricanes ever to hit the U.S., has terrorized people for much of the week — pummeling western Cuba and raking across Florida before gathering strength in the warm waters of the Atlantic Ocean to curve back and strike South Carolina.While Ian's center came ashore near Georgetown, South Carolina, on Friday with much weaker winds than when it crossed Florida's Gulf Coast earlier in the week, the storm left many areas of Charleston's downtown peninsula under water. It also washed way parts of four piers along the coast, including two at Myrtle Beach.Online cameras showed seawater filling neighborhoods in Garden City to calf level. As Ian moved across South Carolina on its way to North Carolina Friday evening, it dropped from a hurricane to a post-tropical cyclone.Ian left a broad swath of destruction in Florida, flooding areas on both of its coasts, tearing homes from their slabs, demolishing beachfront businesses and leaving more than 2 million people without power.Many of the deaths were drownings, including that of a 68-year-old woman swept away into the ocean by a wave. A 67-year-old man who was waiting to be rescued died after falling into rising water inside his home, authorities said.Other storm-related fatalities included a 22-year-old woman who died after an ATV rollover from a road washout and a 71-year-old man who fell off a roof while putting up rain shutters. An 80-year-old woman and a 94-year-old man who relied on oxygen machines also died after the equipment stopped working during power outages.===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory.
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