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Ukrainians adapt to life with intermittent power

SHOTLIST:RESTRICTION SUMMARY:ASSOCIATED PRESSBucha, Ukraine – 28 November 20221. Wide of a tentHEADLINE: 'Invincibility' centers offer refuge, resilience2. Close of sign reading (Ukrainian): "Point of invincibility"3. Various of girl with a dogANNOTATION: Ukraine has rolled out hundreds of "Points of Invincibility" — a defiant name for makeshift centers around the country.4. Close of cups of teaANNOTATION: Often tents are no larger than a conference room where citizens can warm up, charge up, feed and drink up, and entertain as they hunker down.5. Mid people working at a table6. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Mykola Pestikov, 26, Bucha resident:"When the electricity went out, I had to look for a place with a connection. These can be cafes that take energy from other places or I look for a 'point', like now."6. Close of multiplug extension7. Wide of children on their phones as a big TV screen shows football gameANNOTATION: Ukraine's State Emergencies Service has said nearly 1,000 such centers have been erected since the program was first launched Nov. 18.8. Close of boy on his phone9. Various of man watching TVANNOTATION: Controlled outages are necessary to balance the power system and avoid breakdowns – while ensuring power to hospitals and heat-pumping stations.ASSOCIATED PRESSKyiv - 28 November 202210. Wide of people inside a tent11. Close of a man with laptop12. Wide of Kyiv resident Vanda Bronyslavivna sitting inside a tent13. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Vanda Bronyslavavina, 71, Kyiv resident:"I expect (Ukraine) to win, to be honest. But since Russia produced all shields and all that. We are trying to repair it (power stations) and someone targets this point again. They break again. This is the trouble."14. Close of heaterSTORYLINE:Ukraine has rolled out hundreds of "Points of Invincibility" — a defiant name for makeshift centers often no larger than an executive's conference room where beleaguered citizens can warm up, charge their phones, get some food, and entertain themselves as they hunker down to wait out Russian President Vladimir Putin's war on their country. Ukraine's State Emergencies Service has said nearly 1,000 such centers have been erected across the country since the program was first launched Nov. 18, with a website offering an online map to guide people to them. Civilian infrastructure has been badly effected by the war with many areas of the country suffering power and heating outages as winter approaches.===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory.
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