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Bike Index registry busting crime but falls flat on case of stolen Edmonton wheels initially thought to be recovered in Vancouver

Edmonton Journal logo Edmonton Journal 2021-06-22 Nicole Bergot
a man and a woman standing in front of a bicycle: Carrie Candy and Edmonton Police Service Detective Dana Gehring, pose for a photo with her daughter's bicycle outside United Sport and Cycle, 7620 Gateway Blvd., in Edmonton Tuesday June 22, 2021. The bicycle had been stolen during a garage break and enter in Edmonton and was found in Vancouver ten days later. On Tuesday the bicycle was returned to its owners. © Provided by Edmonton Journal Carrie Candy and Edmonton Police Service Detective Dana Gehring, pose for a photo with her daughter's bicycle outside United Sport and Cycle, 7620 Gateway Blvd., in Edmonton Tuesday June 22, 2021. The bicycle had been stolen during a garage break and enter in Edmonton and was found in Vancouver ten days later. On Tuesday the bicycle was returned to its owners.

A 13-year-old girl’s mountain bike stolen in Edmonton was thought to be recovered by Vancouver police thanks to a city police partnership with a bicycle registry service.

The girl’s bike was reported stolen April 14 after a garage break and enter. The teen’s mother registered the bicycle on Bike Index, days after it had been stolen.

Registering the bicycle then led to officers from the Vancouver Police Department identifying what they initially thought was it on April 24, said an Edmonton Police Service (EPS) Tuesday news release.

Vancouver Police members recovered the bike following an encounter with a rider, which included a search on that city’s own bicycle registry, Garage 529. While the make and model of the bike were right, the serial number turned out to be different, said Edmonton police spokeswoman Cheryl Sheppard late Tuesday afternoon.

“Bike thefts are a huge problem in all major cities, and this incident shows the cooperation between our two agencies as well as the effectiveness of these bike registries and recovery programs,” Edmonton city police Det. Dana Gehring said in an earlier statement.

When Specialized Canada learned of the case, the bike company offered to cover the shipping cost from Vancouver to Edmonton. Vancouver’s Reckless Cycle also stepped up to make any necessary repairs to the bike, including a tune up. But now the teen owner of the stolen bike is in limbo, and can wait 90 days for the seized bike if it is not claimed by the rightful owner, said Sheppard.

Since Edmonton city police partnered with Bike Index, over 78,000 bicycles have been registered in the municipal area.

EPS will be holding multiple outdoor public registration events over the summer and invite citizens to visit with their bikes to get signed up. The next registration event is set for June 26, 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at the pedestrian bridge beside Walterdale Bridge.

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