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Civic Museum is on the lookout for an amateur who can crack a '30s-era safe

cbc.ca logo cbc.ca 2019-10-08 Heidi Atter

The Civic Museum of Regina is looking for amateur safecrackers willing to take a shot at opening a 1930s-era safe in their collection. 

The safe, built by Winnipeg Safe Works, came to the museum from the Regina Furniture Company, which closed down in 1979, Rod Deglau says. Now it's sitting there waiting to be opened. 

"It's quite a neat collectible and it's got a big sailing ship in the front," Deglau said. 

The biggest missing piece? What's inside. 

a close up of a device: Rob Deglau says everyone has seen the old movies where people use a stethoscope to help crack open safes. He is giving people a chance to try it out. © Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Rob Deglau says everyone has seen the old movies where people use a stethoscope to help crack open safes. He is giving people a chance to try it out.

"We've never been into it, so we don't have the combination," Deglau said. "It is such a neat collectible that I was struggling to try to figure out how you know how does this piece of history live on."

That prompted a social media post asking for the public's help. Hiring an expert could cost up to $600, Deglau says, but anyone can come and give it a shot. 

"Everyone watched so many old cowboy movies where somebody is coming in with a stethoscope and figured out how to open up a safe. I just want to make it a bit of a competition saying, 'Listen there is a safe sitting in the corner. You go help yourself.

"I don't want it broken, I don't need it blown up with dynamite or nitro, but if anybody wants a chance of cracking a safe by all means," Deglau said. 

a close up of a box: The Civic Museum of Regina is looking for someone to crack open a 1930s safe that's been in their collection for almost two decades. © Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation The Civic Museum of Regina is looking for someone to crack open a 1930s safe that's been in their collection for almost two decades.

If they can open it, it becomes a functional piece of history, Deglau says. Currently, the civic museum is organizing satellite locations around the city. The safe could wind up in a hotel or conference room as one of the displays. 

"Maybe there's a treasure inside," Deglau said. "Come in and become an amateur bank robber."

a painting on the wall: A large sailing ship is on the front of the old safe at the Civic Museum of Regina. © Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation A large sailing ship is on the front of the old safe at the Civic Museum of Regina.
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