You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Parole revoked for man who murdered Banff taxi driver in 1990

Calgary Herald logo Calgary Herald 2022-12-06 Michael Rodriguez
Taxi driver Lucie Turmel was murdered in Banff by Ryan Love in 1990. © Provided by Calgary Herald Taxi driver Lucie Turmel was murdered in Banff by Ryan Love in 1990.

The man who murdered Banff cab driver Lucie Turmel in 1990 is going back to prison after more than 10 years out on parole.

The Parole Board of Canada revoked Ryan Jason Love’s full parole at a November hearing, citing a series of recent events that led board members to believe his “risk in the community became unmanageable.”

“Your index offence is extremely violent and resulted in death of an innocent victim. This crime was committed over 30 years ago, but shows a capacity for extreme unprovoked volatility,” reads a written decision from the parole board dated Nov. 9.

Love, 51, was 18 when he stabbed 23-year-old Turmel 17 times, killing her for her night’s earnings on May 17, 1990. He made off with less than $130.

Love was convicted of second-degree murder in June 1994, receiving a life sentence with no possibility of parole for 20 years. Still, he ended up receiving day parole in 2011 and moved to full parole in 2012.

Until 2019, the parole board said there were no concerns with Love’s adherence to his parole terms. But in 2020, he entered a relationship that his family and parole officer described as “negative and unhealthy” and involved continual “domestic turbulence,” according to the parole board.

 Ryan Love arrives under arrest in Calgary on November 13, 1992 escorted by RCMP Cpl. Doug Morrison, left, and Banff RCMP Const. Nigel Patterson. Ryan Love arrives under arrest in Calgary on November 13, 1992 escorted by RCMP Cpl. Doug Morrison, left, and Banff RCMP Const. Nigel Patterson.

Love was charged with mischief in January 2021 for smashing several windows on the woman’s vehicle with a baseball bat. He was convicted and served 30 days in jail.

The parole board gave him a reprimand and mandated he go to counselling and report any relationships with women, but did not revoke his parole.

On Aug. 22 this year, Love was pulled over in a “high-risk downtown area” of an unidentified city with a drunk woman in his car. While police let him go after a roadside breath test, he was later questioned by his parole officer.

Love later admitted to the parole board he lied to the officer about the nature of the incident.

His story regarding the woman — and an “acquaintance” he initially claimed asked him to pick up the woman — changed multiple times during interviews with his parole officer. His cellphone records indicated he had a closer relationship with the man than he implied.

“You said you lied about this because you knew he was a negative associate,” reads the parole board’s decision. The relationship breached the conditions of his parole.

“Your (case management team) found that with your deteriorated performance under supervision and dishonesty, your risk had escalated and become unmanageable. Warrants were issued for your apprehension and suspension.”

The board revoked Love’s full parole, noting he had “returned to (his) crime cycle” and had breached multiple conditions of his parole relating to the Aug. 22 event and his subsequent lies.

The parole board also considered as mitigating factors his lengthy period of adherence to his parole conditions, as well as letters of support from his employer, a co-worker and a farmer who knows him. It also noted he recently began taking prescription medication for anxiety and depression and plans to live with his parents in the event he’s released again.

mrodriguez@postmedia.com

Twitter:  @michaelrdrguez

AdChoices
AdChoices

More from Calgary Herald

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon