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Blind and homeless amid Somalia's drought

SHOT LIST:RESTRICTION SUMMARY:ASSOCIATED PRESSDollow, Somalia – 19 September 20221. Various drone shots of camp for displaced peopleASSOCIATED PRESSDollow, Somalia – 20 September 20222. Wide water drums lined up with women and young girls at the taps ANNOTATION: The most severe drought in more than half a century in Somalia is forcing hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes.3. Wide water trickling into drum4. Wide people sweeping the land they are to erect their tents 5. Various women erecting their tent using branches from treeASSOCIATED PRESS Dollow, Somalia – 21 September 20226. SOUNDBITE (English) Petroc Wilton, World Food Programme spokesperson:++PARTIALLY COVERED++ "300,000 people are looking down the barrel of catastrophic food insecurity and many of them are coming here. This section behind me wasn't here 48 hours ago. Hundreds of thousands of people are flooding into these camps, looking for assistance every day. You can really see the scale of the problem."ASSOCIATED PRESS Dollow, Somalia – 20 September 20227. Mohamed Kheir Issack and Issack Farow Hassan arrive at displacement camp8. Mohamed Kheir Issack and Issack Farow Hassan stand next to their hut in the campANNOTATION: Among the new arrivals to the camp are Mohamed Kheir Issack and Issack Farow Hassan, two blind men who are close friends.9. Close of Hassan's cane on the ground10. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Mohamed Kheir Issack, displaced Somali:"We've experienced drought before but never the type that will move you out of your village. We've never gone through such drought."11. Wide of the two men inside their hutANNOTATION: The two men arrived at the displacement camp with little but utensils and their clothes.12. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Mohamed Kheir Issack, displaced Somali:"There was no one to look after us but we thank Allah. We couldn't even fend for ourselves. During our travel to Dollow there were no NGO's or any sort of help. We walked for an entire week with no food at all and no one to shelter us."13. Issack and Hassan shaking hands inside hut14. Wide displaced people at camp15. Close little kid next to hutASSOCIATED PRESS Dollow, Somalia – 21 September 202216. SOUNDBITE (English) Petroc Wilton, World Food Programme spokesperson:++PARTIALLY COVERED++"As of August, we reached 4.4 million people with humanitarian relief. That's more than we've ever reached in Somalia, ever. We reached almost half a million with nutrition support. It is making a difference. We have kept the world at bay so far, but famine right now is an imminent reality in those parts of the bioregion, and that could spread if it breaks out."ASSOCIATED PRESS Dollow, Somalia – 20 September 202217. Women and children waiting in line at camp18. Various of two women building hut19. Various of displaced people carrying water drumsANNOTATION: Somalia has long suffered droughts, but climate change is making them more frequent and intense, leaving less time to recover and prepare for the next.STORYLINE:The most alarming drought in more than half a century in Somalia is forcing hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes.Outside the southern town of Dollow, a camp for displaced people is rapidly growing. Among the new arrivals are Mohamed Kheir Issack and Issack Farow Hassan, two blind men who are friends and as close as brothers. The two men had always lived in their southern community of Ufurow, about 300 kilometers (186 miles) away, and had never moved from it until now. This drought stripped them of their animals and homes.At the displacement camp, their new neighbors gave the men materials to help build their huts. They had arrived with little but utensils and their clothes.Somalia has long known droughts, but the climate shocks are now coming more frequently, leaving less room to recover and prepare for the next. Pastoralists and farmers like Issack and Hassan have known for generations where to take cattle, goats and camels when the usual water sources run dry.Now they have been horrified by this drought that has seen four straight rainy seasons fail.When rain does fall, more unpredictably now, hotter temperatures mean it evaporates faster, leaving meager amounts for farming or drinking. East Africa is the world's hardest-hit drought region, according to the U.N.'s desertification agency.Video by: Nqobile Ntshangase and Jerome DelayProduced by: Teresa de Miguel---This story was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. This story is part of an ongoing series exploring the lives of people around the world who have been forced to move because of rising seas, drought, searing temperatures and other things caused or exacerbated by climate change.===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory.
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