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'One simple trick with your mouth' How to stop snoring and get a good night's sleep

Daily Express logo Daily Express 16/06/2022 Aimee Robinson
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Almost half of the UK population snore at some point while . According to figures from the British Snoring and Sleep Apnoea Association, 41.5 percent of UK adults are susceptible to the bedtime habit, including 57 percent of adult men and 40 percent of adult women.

However, one expert claimed to have the solution to snoring, and all it takes is "one simple trick with your mouth".

Katherine Hall, a psychologist in sleep from Somnus Therapy, in partnership with Happy Beds, revealed that "repeating your vowels out loud" before bedtime could be the solution.

She explained: "Anti-snoring throat exercises are a great way to strengthen the muscles in your throat and stop them from vibrating as you sleep - the cause of snoring.

"A few times a day, spend a few minutes repeating each of the vowels (a-e-i-o-u) out loud and over time you'll s

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trick to stop snoring © Getty images trick to stop snoring

Why do we snore?

Snoring can occur for a number of reasons and personal factors.

According to the : "Snoring is caused by things such as your tongue, mouth, throat or airways in your nose vibrating as you breathe.

"It happens because these parts of your body relax and narrow when you're asleep."

You are more likely to snore if you:

  • are overweight
  • smoke
  • drink too much alcohol
  • sleep on your back

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Why do we snore?

Snoring can occur for a number of reasons and personal factors.

According to the NHS: "Snoring is caused by things such as your tongue, mouth, throat or airways in your nose vibrating as you breathe.

"It happens because these parts of your body relax and narrow when you're asleep."

You are more likely to snore if you:

are overweight

smoke

drink too much alcohol

sleep on your back

In some cases, snoring can be caused by medical conditions.

Sleep apnoea, for example, can increase the risk of snoring because your airways become temporarily blocked while you're asleep.

Your GP can assist in snoring in certain cases, though they will need to identify if there was a specific medical condition causing the habit.

At an appointment, your GP will likely inspect the inside of your mouth and nose to check for any problems that might be causing your snoring.

Man snoring in bed © Getty Images Man snoring in bed

The NHS recommended bringing someone with you to your appointment who can describe what your snoring sounds like, such as a partner.

The health service added: "The GP may refer you to a specialist for treatment or further tests if they're not sure what the cause is."

Treatment is then determined based on the cause of your snoring.

For example, if you snore because your tongue is partially blocking the back of your throat, you may be offered a special device to wear in your mouth while sleeping.

This is called a mandibular advancement device and works to bring your tongue forward.

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