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What is cystic acne?

Cover Media logo Cover Media 02/07/2020
Lili Reinhart posing for the camera © Sheri Determan/WENN.com/Cover Images

Riverdale star Lili Reinhart recently shared how she is learning to accept her cystic acne rather than be ashamed of it.

In an interview with U.S. Marie Claire, the 23-year-old revealed how her self-esteem would be knocked whenever she had an acne flare-up.

"I used to let a breakout debilitate me. I wouldn't leave the house because I was so ashamed and would wear a baseball cap to cover my face if I did have to go somewhere. I would even avoid mirrors," she confessed.

But what is the skin condition? Find out more about it and how to treat it below.

What is cystic acne?

"Cystic acne is a more aggressive form of acne caused by build-up of debris deep in the pores," explains Julia Marinkovich, COSRX UK representative. "It can cause severe, painful cysts and irritation, making the skin appear red and painful and sensitive to touch. This occurs more often in people with oily skin and will require a more adhesive treatment to tackle the impurities trapped deep in the pores. At the same time the skin is often extremely irritated so it is essential to use products that won’t completely dry out the skin and cause further irritation to the site infected."

What products should you use?

The skincare expert recommends the COSRX AC Collection Calming Foam Cleanser, which thoroughly cleanses the skin of any impurities, sebum and dead skin cells, and the Banobagi Milk Thistle Repair Mask, a sheet mask which will provide a boost of anti-inflammatories to help relieve pain and inflammation.

Should I seek medical advice?

According to experts at Britain's NHS, if you have a moderate or severe type of acne, you should see your GP, who can give you prescription medicine, such as topical treatments or antibiotics, or refer you to a dermatologist.


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