You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

MP demands seagulls are 'fed contraceptives' after pet chihuahua snatched

Mirror logo Mirror 27/07/2019 Tiffany Lo
a bird standing on top of a sandy beach: The seagulls are getting aggressive and attack people and animal on streets © Getty Images/EyeEm The seagulls are getting aggressive and attack people and animal on streets

An MP has called on the government to feed the seagulls contraceptives after reports of pets being abducted and beach-goers attacked by the sea birds.

A chihuahua called Gizmo was snatched away by a gull last week from its owner's garden in Devon and people have come under attack by the ferocious birds.

John Woodcock, the Independent MP for Barrow and Furness, who had previously called for a national seagull summit to tackle the problem, also said Brexit could help to remove protections for the birds, allowing more direct action to be taken.

John Woodcock wearing a suit and tie: John Woodcock, MP for Barrow and Furness, suggested to put contraceptives in food for seagulls © PA John Woodcock, MP for Barrow and Furness, suggested to put contraceptives in food for seagulls Mr Woodcock said: "The seagull issue has been a menace for years. Putting contraceptives in food has been effective in some areas.

"An alternative is replacing their eggs with fakes."

a bird flying over a body of water: Mr Woodcock said the seagull issue has been a menace for years © Getty Images/iStockphoto Mr Woodcock said the seagull issue has been a menace for years

The latest figures show that the number of gulls in Britain has quadrupled in the first 15 years of this century.

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds stated that all seven breeds of gull in the UK are subject to 'conservative concern' despite an increase in population.

a small brown animal: Gizmo was last seen bring dragged into the afternoon sky by a gull © PA Gizmo was last seen bring dragged into the afternoon sky by a gull But Mr Woodcock believed the charity was being overprotective and suggested them to put their efforts on the breeds that are struggling to live in the wild.

He said: "Let local communities take action against the fat, aggressive urban sods that dive bomb us, crap on our cars, steal food out of our hands and terrorise our pets."

All species of gull are protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, which made it illegal to kill or injure any gull or damage its nest.

a sign on the side of the street: The hunt is on for the dog © SWNS The hunt is on for the dog

BBC Science Focus suggested that there has been no change in that 'they have always been very aggressive'.

The fear of gulls is not limited to the UK only but residents in Australia worried that drug-resistant bugs from the gulls could cause infections in people.

a man sitting on a couch posing for the camera: Roy and Brenda, of Knott End, near Morecambe Bay, Lancashire, were confronted by a squawking seagull desperate to protect her chicks © Lee McLean / SWNS.com Roy and Brenda, of Knott End, near Morecambe Bay, Lancashire, were confronted by a squawking seagull desperate to protect her chicks The germs can be transferred through the contact with the bird's excrement, which is commonly seen in public spaces.

The RSPB has responded to Mr Woodcock's 'contraceptives' proposal and said "the most effective measures to discouraging gulls nesting in urban areas is to reduce access to food and the attractiveness of nest sites."

a close up of an animal: Mr Pickard had to be taken to hospital to treat head wounds © Lee McLean / SWNS.com Mr Pickard had to be taken to hospital to treat head wounds

The four-year-old Gizmo was picked up by a seagull from the home garden where owner Rebecca Hill's partner witnessed the brazen act.

Ms Hill and other neighbours have been searching in the gardens and roads surrounding the home in a bid to find Gizmo.

A pensioner claimed he was trapped in his home for six days after seagulls repeatedly attacked him and his wife.

Roy Pickard, 77, needed treatment in hospitalĀ  for cuts to the back of his head after the birds swooped to protect their young outside his home in Knott End, near Morecambe Bay, Lancashire.

AdChoices
AdChoices

More from The Mirror

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon